In this Book

summary
As the world has been reshaped since the 1970s by economic globalization, neoliberalism, and financialization, writers and artists have addressed the problem of representing the economy with a new sense of political urgency. Anxieties over who controls capitalism have thus been translated into demands upon literature, art, and mass media to develop strategies of representation that can account for capitalism’s power.

Reading Capitalist Realism presents some of the latest and most sophisticated approaches to the question of the relation between capitalism and narrative form, partly by questioning how the “realism” of austerity, privatization, and wealth protection relate to the realism of narrative and cultural production. Even as critics have sought to locate a new aesthetic mode that might consider and move beyond theorizations of the postmodern, this volume contends that narrative realism demands renewed scrutiny for its ability to represent capitalism’s latest scenes of enclosure and indebtedness.

Ranging across fiction, nonfiction, television, and film, the essays collected here explore to what extent realism is equipped to comprehend and historicize our contemporary economic moment and what might be the influence or complicity of the literary in shaping the global politics of lowered expectations. Including essays on writers such as Mohsin Hamid, Lorrie Moore, Jess Walter, J. M. Coetzee, James Kelman, Ali Smith, Russell Banks, William Vollmann, and William Gibson, as well as examinations of Hollywood film productions and The Wire television series, Reading Capitalist Realism calls attention to a resurgence of realisms across narrative genres and questions realism’s ability to interrogate the crisis-driven logic of political and economic “common sense.”

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction: A Theory of Capitalist Realism
  2. Alison Shonkwiler and Leigh Claire La Berge
  3. pp. 1-25
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. We Can’t Afford to Be Realists: A Conversation
  2. Jodi Dean and Mark Fisher
  3. pp. 26-38
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Part I. Novelistic Realisms
  2. pp. 39-40
  1. Adultery, Crisis, Contract
  2. Andrew Hoberek
  3. pp. 41-63
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Things Break Apart: James Kelman, Ali Smith, and the Neoliberal Novel
  2. Alissa G. Karl
  3. pp. 64-88
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Things As They Were or Are: On Russell Banks’s Global Realisms
  2. Phillip E. Wegner
  3. pp. 89-112
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Part II. Genres of Mediation
  2. pp. 113-114
  1. Capitalist Realism and Serial Form: The Fifth Season of The Wire
  2. Leigh Claire La Berge
  3. pp. 115-139
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Like Some Dummy Corporation You Just Move around the Board: Contemporary Hollywood Production in Virtual Time and Space
  2. J. D. Connor
  3. pp. 140-176
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Anti-Capitalism and Anti-Realism in William T. Vollmann’s Poor People
  2. Caren Irr
  3. pp. 177-192
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Part III. After and Against Representation
  2. pp. 193-194
  1. Beyond Realism -
  2. Michael W. Clune
  3. pp. 195-212
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Capitalism and Reification: The Logic of the Instance
  2. Timothy Bewes
  3. pp. 213-241
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Communist Realism
  2. Joshua Clover
  3. pp. 242-247
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Afterword: Unreal Criticism
  2. Richard Dienst
  3. pp. 248-254
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 255-258
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 259-260
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Series Page
  2. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9781609382636
Related ISBN
9781609382346
MARC Record
OCLC
875819800
Pages
272
Launched on MUSE
2014-04-24
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.