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Innovations in Government
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The Innovations in American Government Awards Program began in 1985 with a grant from the Ford Foundation to the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard to conduct a program of awards for innovations in state and local government. The foundation's objective was ambitious and, in an era of "government is the problem" rhetoric, determinedly proactive. It sought to counter declining public confidence in government by highlighting innovative and effective programs. Over twenty years later, research, recognition, and replication are the source of the program's continuing influence and its vitality. What is the future of government innovation? How can innovation enhance the quality of life for citizens and strengthen democratic governance? Innovations in Government: Research, Recognition, and Replication answers these questions by presenting a comprehensive approach to advancing the practice and study of innovation in government. The authors discuss new research on innovation, explore the impact of several programs that recognize innovation, and consider challenges to the replication of innovations. Contributors include Eugene Bardach (University of California– Berkeley), Robert Behn (Harvard University), John D. Donahue (Harvard University), Marta Ferreira Santos Farah (Center for Public Administration and Government, Fundação Getulio Vargas), Archon Fung (Harvard University), Jean Hartley (University of Warwick), Steven Kelman (Harvard University), Gowher Rizvi (Ash Institute for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard University), Peter Spink (Center for Public Administration and Government, Fundação Getulio Vargas), and Jonathan Walters (Governing).

Table of Contents

  1. Front Cover
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  1. Title Page
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  1. Copyright Information
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  1. Table of Contents
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. vii-xi
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  1. 1 Introduction
  2. Sandford Borins
  3. pp. 1-12
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  1. 2 Twenty Years of Highlighting Excellence in Government
  2. Jonathan Walters
  3. pp. 13-27
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  1. 3 The "Kennedy School School" of Research on Innovation in Government
  2. Steven Kelman
  3. pp. 28-51
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  1. 4 Citizen Participation in Government Innovations
  2. Archon Fung
  3. pp. 52-70
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  1. 5 Subnational Government Innovation in a Comparative Perspective: Brazil
  2. Marta Ferreira Santos Farah and Peter Spink
  3. pp. 71-92
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  1. 6 The Unaccustomed Inventiveness of the Labor Department
  2. John D. Donahue
  3. pp. 93-112
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  1. 7 Developmental Processes: A Conceptual Exploration
  2. Eugene Bardach
  3. pp. 113-137
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  1. 8 The Adoption of Innovation: The Challenge of Learning to Adapt Tacit Knowledge
  2. Robert D. Behn
  3. pp. 138-158
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  1. 9 Does Innovation Lead to Improvement in Public Services? Lessons from the Beacon Scheme in the United Kingdom
  2. Jean Hartley
  3. pp. 159-187
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  1. 10 Innovations in Government: Serving Citizens and Strengthening Democracy
  2. Gowher Rizvi
  3. pp. 188-198
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  1. 11 Research on Innovations in Government: What Next?
  2. Sandford Borins
  3. pp. 199-206
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  1. References
  2. pp. 207-220
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  1. Contributors
  2. p. 221
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 223-231
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  1. Back Cover
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