Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Series Info, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

The editors acknowledge the following individuals for their important contributions to this book: Roy Ash, whose service and accomplishments in many sectors of government, for profit, and philanthropic, represent the very best in American citizenship; ...

read more

1. The Key to Networked Government

Donald F. Kettl

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

Even the most casual look at how government programs actually operate raises big questions about orthodox theories of public policy. Translating big ideas into reality requires collaboration among many players. Government social service programs ripple out through a huge collection of nonprofit community-based organizations, ...

read more

2. From Conflict to Collaboration: Lessons in Networked Governance from the Federal Cooperative Conservation Initiative

William D. Eggers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-33

One day in 1948, a convoy of Michigan sportsmen drove their pickup trucks to Lansing to dump piles of dead, oil-soaked ducks on the lawn of the state capitol.1 Oil slicks on the Detroit River killed waterfowl every winter, but with a toll of 11,000, 1948 had seen the worst carnage ever.2 ...

read more

3. Governing the Climate from Sacramento

Barry G. Rabe

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 34-61

The conventional wisdom of a decade ago tagged climate change as a straightforward public policy problem. The science was indeed complex, but virtually all scholarly analysis suggested that the global scope of the problem would necessitate a global response. ...

read more

4. Networks in the Shadow of Government: The Chesapeake Bay Program

Paul Posner

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 62-94

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in North America, and with its watershed is home to more than 3,600 species and 16 million people. The watershed covers a land area of more than 64,000 square miles and includes portions of six states—Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and New York—and the District of Columbia. ...

read more

5. Moving from Core Functions to Core Values: Lessons from State Eligibility Modernizations

Stephen Goldsmith, Tim Burke

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 95-120

For over forty years, millions of struggling households across all fifty states have relied on the same cumbersome system of county welfare offices to tap into the U.S. social safety net. With inconvenient hours, little customer service, and wasteful spending, many of these offices typify government bureaucracy at its worst. ...

read more

6. "Integration and Innovation" in the Intelligence Community: The Role of a Netcentric Environment, Managed Networks, and Social Networks

G. Edward DeSeve

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-144

The United States is challenged by many different and evolving threats, including enemies with many faces and no borders—terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, proliferation, infectious diseases, cyber attacks, and illegal trafficking. The intelligence community (IC) is adjusting to meet this new complex threat environment and adapt to the new strategic context in which it now operates. ...

read more

7. The United States Coast Guard and a Port Security Network of Shared Responsibility

Anne M. Khademian and William G. Berberich

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-167

The U.S. economy and economies around the globe depend upon safe, secure, and just-in-time maritime trade. A third of the world economy and more than a quarter of the U.S. economy are dependent upon international trade, and more than 95 percent of non–North American trade enters the United States by ship, through our ports. ...

read more

8. Dark Networks and the Problem of Islamic Jihadist Terrorism

H. Brinton Milward, Jörg Raab

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 168-189

Most writers advocating networks have ignored the nature of the problem networking is supposed to solve. It is usually argued that networks are better than hierarchies for solving nonroutine, nonstandardized, ill-structured (Simon 1973), or “wicked” (Rittel and Webber 1973) problems. ...

read more

9. Networked Government: Survey of Rationales, Forms, and Techniques

Mark H. Moore

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 190-228

In recent years, practitioners and scholars of public management have looked to the concept of “networked government” to guide improvements in government performance.1 At the core of this idea is the belief that the old organizational form of government—a centralized executive branch consisting of large, hierarchical organizations, each with its own distinct, well-defined mission, ...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-240

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 241-244

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 245-252

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF