Cover

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Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Introduction

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pp. 1-22

Musical artist Lauryn Hill uses lyrics and accents that evince both African American and West Indian flavors to reconstruct her life as a youth in Irvington, New Jersey. In particular, her reference to enjoying “a beef patty and some coco bread,” a typical Jamaican lunch, and her location of the action on “Main Street, U.S.A.” ...

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Part One: The Making of a Race (Man)

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pp. 23-28

Part One explicates the making of a race man in the middle of the nineteenth century. The man is Plácido, free Cuban poet of color. In deciding to highlight or downplay Plácido’s racial and national identities (as well as, less explicitly, his gentlemanly or uncivilized carriage) ...

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1 The View from Above: Plácido Through the Eyes of the Cuban Colonial Government and White Abolitionists

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pp. 29-47

The Haitian Revolution (1791–1804) and the fear its success prompted caused profound changes not only in Haitian society but in slave societies across the hemisphere. It sent a shiver up the collective spine of the slaveholders (and abolitionists) because it forced the realization that Black uprisings could actually be successful. ...

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2 The View from Next Door: Plácido Through Black Abolitionists’ Eyes

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pp. 48-80

Tales of the life and death of Plácido, Cuban poet of color, spread widely after his execution in 1844 for allegedly leading one of the largest uprisings in Cuban history. Inherent in the discourse on Plácido (then and now) is a tension between the view of him as an exemplar of the particularities of the Cuban context ...

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Part Two: Both (Race) and (Nation)?

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pp. 81-86

As Part One has shown, the ascription or denial of racial consciousness and national identity constituted a crucial and prevalent element of public representations of people of African descent in the Americas in the wake of the Haitian Revolution. ...

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3 On Being Black and Cuban: Race, Nation, and Romanticism in the Poetry of Plácido

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pp. 87-113

As the previous chapters illustrate, in the two decades following his 1844 execution, Plácido, Cuban poet of color and political activist, was held up by disparate forces inside and outside Cuba as the ultimate example of a race man. ...

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4 “We Intend to Stay Here”: The International Shadows in Frederick Douglass’s Representations of African American Community

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pp. 114-128

Frederick Douglass, over the course of his life, went from being a slave on U.S. soil to being U.S. consul in Haiti. That is to say, he went from being one not even considered fully human according to U.S. law, to being a representative of the U.S. government in a foreign country. ...

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5 “More a Haitian Than an American”: Frederick Douglass and the Black World Beyond the United States

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pp. 129-152

Before the Appendix to The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, his final autobiography, Douglass virtually never mentions the other Black Americas in his autobiographies. The silence on the other Black American world can certainly be explained in part by recalling the historical context. ...

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Part Three: Negating Nation, Rejecting Race

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pp. 153-156

As Part Two has illustrated, in the wake of the Haitian Revolution, people of African descent’s juggling of racial consciousness and national identity, a challenge born of both their need to defend themselves in the face of others’ notions of their identities and their internal struggle with self-definition ...

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6 A Slave’s Cosmopolitanism: Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave, and the Geography of Identity

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pp. 157-186

Mary Prince, the orator of the first slave narrative by a woman in the Americas, was born into slavery in 1788, just three years before the foundations of the Caribbean and the Atlantic world more broadly were to be profoundly shaken by the revolution in Haiti. ...

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7 Disidentification as Identity: Juan Francisco Manzano and the Flight from Blackness

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pp. 187-204

Juan Francisco Manzano was born in Cuba in 1797 to the slaves Maria Pilar Manzano and Toribio Castro. For the first twelve years of his life, Manzano lived a life of relative privilege, doted upon by his mistress as “the child of her old age.”1 ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 205-210

This book has traced the underpinnings of people of African descent’s frequently troubled and, too often, troubling representations of and engagements with each other to the Atlantic power structures’ denial of their humanity. ...

Notes

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pp. 211-256

Bibliography

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pp. 257-276

Index

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pp. 277-288

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 289-291

The debt of gratitude I owe to numerous individuals far, near, and in between for providing me with myriad forms of sustenance along the journey represented by Black Cosmopolitanism is immeasurable. Although I cannot hope to recall and list everyone by name, I humbly ask that all of you will accept what follows as a token of my appreciation. ...