Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-8

The civil rights movement and the debates over the Vietnam War were at the center of the turbulence of the 1960s. After all, the civil rights and antiwar movements were two of the greatest protest movements of twentieth-century America (the labor movement was a third). They sharpened the...

read more

1. The Cold War and the Long Civil Rights Movement

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-36

A decade before President Johnson plunged the nation into a large-scale war in Vietnam, famed African American entertainer Paul Robeson was under siege. His personal and financial fortunes had plummeted after the U.S. government revoked his passport in 1950 because of his outspoken...

read more

2. African Americans and the Long Cold War Thaw, 1954-1965

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-72

The Geneva Accords of 1954 signified the end of France’s colonial empire in the Far East. Among other things, it temporarily divided Vietnam at the seventeenth parallel and called for free elections by 1956. Wishing to distance themselves from the taint of compromise with the communist forces...

read more

3. Vietnam and Civil Rights

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 73-110

On August 6, 1965, approximately six months after transforming the conflict in Vietnam into an American war, Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act in a solemn ceremony at the Capitol. Approximately seventy years since African Americans were systematically disenfranchised in the...

read more

4. The Vietnam War and Black Power

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 111-140

After its crowning legislative accomplishments in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement floundered in 1966. With the Vietnam War now sucking the life from the Great Society and the civil rights agenda stalled in Congress, African Americans’ impatience and anger mounted. This was best...

read more

5. Dr. King's Painful Dilemma

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-168

On the evening of Monday, March 15, 1965, Martin Luther King Jr. was emotionally and physically drained. He huddled with a few close aides in front of a small black-and-white television in a living room in Selma, Alabama, anxiously awaiting President Johnson’s address to Congress on...

read more

6. The Second Coming of Martin Luther King Jr., 1966-1968

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-212

By 1966, King’s prayers had not been answered, and the military escalation in Vietnam continued unabated. LBJ was consumed by the war, and civil rights leaders discerned a diminution in his passion for civil rights.1 Vietnam would cast its shadow on American life well into the 1970s and...

read more

7. Moderates and the Vietnam War

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-248

Ever since the end of Reconstruction, African Americans had yearned and struggled for acceptance in mainstream, middle-class American life. Langston Hughes’s “I, Too, Sing America” poignantly encapsulated African Americans’ wish to share in the American Dream.1 By the summer of...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 249-254

By the time U.S. troops finally withdrew from Vietnam in January 1973, all the civil rights organizations had expressed their opposition to the war—some sooner than others, and for differing rationales. However, it was Lyndon Johnson’s departure from the White House that marked the...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-258

Historians research and write in relative isolation, but this book could not have been completed without the support and assistance of family, friends, librarians, institutions, and numerous historians who offered valuable advice and critical feedback. I am thrilled to acknowledge the numerous...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 259-324

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 325-346

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 347-366

Series Page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Images

pdf iconDownload PDF