Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-ii

Contents

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pp. iii-iv

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Introduction

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pp. v-x

...contemporaries, MacDonald was both respected by the literary establishment and popular with the reading public. This conception of MacDonald was lost in the twentieth century. His ideas fell out of fashion, and the majority of MacDonald’s works were...

Part I. Belief and Scepticism

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1. The Idea of Tradition in George MacDonald

STEPHEN PRICKETT

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pp. 1-17

...phenomena of the past three hundred years: the virtual disappearance and subsequent re-invention of the word ‘tradition’. From Addison and Burke, to Warburton or Wesley, anyone who looks for the word in the eighteenth century will have to look very hard indeed. Paine we might...

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2. 'Divine Alchemy': The Miracles of Our Lord in its Context

DANIEL GABELMAN

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pp. 18-35

...sapping the proof from miracles that Victorians were so heavily engaged in attacking and defending them. Indeed, since the Enlightenment, miracles had been one of the most contested intellectual subjects as both opponents and supporters of...

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3. 'With all sorts of doubts I am familiar': George MacDonald's Literary Response to John Ruskin's Struggles with Epistemology

JOCELYNE SLEPYAN

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pp. 36-51

...be ignored until it could no longer be denied. Inside the church, the undermining of literal interpretations of Scripture caused confusion for both evangelicals and mainstream churchgoers, while the realm of science brought new geological and biological...

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4. Thomas Wingfold, Curate and the Mid-Nineteenth-Century Eugenics Debate

GINGER STELLE

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pp. 52-68

...theories had been discussed and debated for nearly two decades. This early debate took many forms and involved people all across the scientific, political, literary, and religious sectors of society. As the other chapters in this volume illustrate, George MacDonald was an active...

Part II. Social Reform and Gender

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5. George MacDonald's Approach to Victorian Social Reform in The Vicar's Daughter

JEFFREY W. SMITH

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pp. 69-83

...considering George MacDonald’s social views and concerns regarding the turbulent working conditions in London, as well as the significance of the novel’s secondary character Marion Clare, the direction of the plot becomes more decided and the focus of the story becomes more pronounced, revealing insight into...

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6. Military Bodies and Masculinity in 'The Broken Swords'

JENNY NEOPHYTOU

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pp. 84-104

...the warm, rich, more indolent South’.1 In this image, railway technology separates the field from MacDonald’s memories of his childhood home, while simultaneously creating a conduit through which the perceived characteristics (both moral and physical) of North and South can pass. The body, overlaid by artificial iron...

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7. God and Gender in Robert Falconer: Deifying the Feminine

PHILIP HICKOK

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pp. 105-120

...Rolland Hein has argued that ‘George MacDonald was first of all a Christian; secondly an artist’. Hein supports this claim with Ronald MacDonald’s assertion that his father turned to writing novels as a means of communicating his religious...

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8. Imagining Reformed Communities: Discussing Social Myths in George MacDonald's Princess Novels and Christina Rossetti's 'Goblin Market'

CHRISTINE CHETTLE

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pp. 121-139

...of the imagination to negotiate social boundaries. In an 1865 letter to her brother, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Christina defends her choice of illegitimacy as a poetic subject on the grounds that her poetic imagination allows her to transcend differences in experience: ‘[u]nless white could be black and Heaven Hell my experience...

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9. Sitting on the Doorstep: MacDonald's Aesthetic Fantasy Worlds and the Divine Child-Figure

ALLY CROCKFORD

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pp. 140-156

...fantasy stories and novels in particular – are immediately presented with an unmistakable idealisation of the essence of childhood embodied in his protagonists, child and adult alike, and his vision of the divine. His perspective is stated baldly in the first volume of...

Part III. Ideals and Nightmares

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10. Stirring the Senses: Identity and Suspense in George MacDonald's David Elginbrod

ELIZABETH ANDREWS

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pp. 157-174

...situating their tales in the realistic domestic sphere employed by the latter authors. The sensational subjects of this subgenre of the Victorian novel revolve around the rules that govern the domestic sphere. This preoccupation, illustrated by sensation novelists through the criminalised depiction of shocking and scandalous domestic mysteries...

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11. 'La Belle Dame' – Lilith and the Romantic Vampire Tradition

DAVID MELVILLE WINGROVE

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pp. 175-197

...his unorthodox spiritual views, so Lilith has been persistently ignored and omitted by ‘gatekeepers’ of the canon of Gothic fiction. This novel, perhaps, is simply too strange even for those who revel in the notion of ‘strangeness’ – or who like their books to be ‘strange’ in a prescribed and predictable way. At the dawn...

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12. Gothic Degeneration and Romantic Rebirth in Donal Grant

JENNIFER KOOPMAN

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pp. 198-215

...root of MacDonald’s general inferiority as a realistic novelist’.3 William Raeper offers a more nuanced response, positioning the book as a ‘pure romance’, a work that characterises the shift in MacDonald’s prose from earlier realist stories ‘where romance and reality jostle...

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13. George MacDonald and the Visual Arts

HELEN SUTHERLAND

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pp. 216-234

...To accept this evaluation of MacDonald as an exceptional figure who somehow stood outside the culture in which he lived is, however, to accept an inherently unbalanced and incomplete account of him, both as a man and as a writer, for the evidence suggests he was much more centrally placed than this account can allow...

Part IV. Scotland

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14. Speaking Matrilineally (and Especially of Uncle Mackintosh MacKay)

KIRSTIN JEFFREY JOHNSON

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pp. 235-253

...vast. That MacDonald considered himself a Celt, not only a Scot, and that this shaped his thinking and his writing, is a point he reiterates time and again. His proud parading in Highland gear, whether as a student in Aberdeen or decades later as an old patriarch...

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15. How the Fairies were not Invited to Court

JOHN PATRICK PAZDZIORA

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pp. 254-272

...case with Oscar Wilde, that Lang’s connection with MacDonald is invisible or nonexistent. Lang read, reviewed, and enjoyed MacDonald; thus, given Lang’s stature as a critic, it seems reasonable to assume that MacDonald was at least aware of him. Both found much of their literary identity within the Scottish tradition, particularly...

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16. George MacDonald and the Grave Livers of Scotland

DAVID S. ROBB

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pp. 273-290

...emerges as a kind of divinely inspired action-man, a capeless crusader, equally at home in checkmating Funkelstein the evil mesmerist as in chatting in homely Doric speech with an Aberdeen-born London policeman. Hugh’s eventual beloved...

Back Cover

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