Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-ii

Contents

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pp. iii-iv

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Acknowledgements

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pp. v-vi

...the Scottish Motor Museum Trust. The map on p. 134 appears by courtesy of Ian Thompson, with cartography by Mike Shand. The Association for Scottish Literary Studies would like to thank the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park for their support...

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1. Literary pilgrimage as cultural imperialism and 'Scott-land'

IAN BROWN

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pp. 1-28

...Forms of tourism linked to literature were not new. Nor were their impacts always neutral or benign. In 1759, according to Edmund Malone, the Reverend Francis Gastrell cut down a mulberry tree supposed to have been planted by Shakespeare in the grounds...

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2. 'A place much celebrated in England': Loch katrine and the Trossachs before The Lady of the Lake

TOM FURNISS

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pp. 29-44

...Romantic localities in Scotland we need to bear in mind that it was Loch Lomond that attracted travellers and tourists in the eighteenth century, not Loch Katrine, and that the impact of Scott’s poem in alluring large numbers of visitors to the Trossachs...

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3. Scott and tourism

ALASTAIR J. DURIE

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pp. 45-55

..nineteenth century. There was a widening of direction; what had once been mainly focused on Europe became a much more diffuse stream. This was change powered by choice; more time and more free income and better transport meant more...

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4. Holiday romances; or, Loch Katrine and the literary tourist

NICOLA J. WATSON

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pp. 56-69

...itself, all of which worked to bind poem and place together within the nineteenth-century imagination. As a result, for a hundred years after the publication of Scott’s best-seller, it was impossible to see Loch Katrine other than suffused...

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5. Wildness and wet: artistic interactions and the Trossachs' designation as a National Park

JIM ALISON

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pp. 70-84

...Tyndrum, from St Fillans in the east to Glenbranter in the west. Among the potentially conflicting duties laid upon the Park Authority, the priority is to ‘conserve and enhance’ the region’s cultural heritage.2 Focusing on one small aspect of this remit...

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6. Rob Roy: trade, improvement and the destruction of 'native' cultures

DAVID HEWITT

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pp. 85-97

...name, for he includes an introduction of 135 pages, the effect of which is to focus the novel upon Rob Roy. He does not base his account of the man upon contemporary written documents as David Stevenson does...

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7. 'Woe to him who has lost his voice': re-discovering the Gaelic literature of the Lennox and Menteith

MICHAEL NEWTON

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pp. 98-112

...Sir Walter Scott did not discover the Trossachs, just as neither Christopher Columbus, Leif Erikson, nor Sir Henry Sinclair discovered America. Nor did he initiate literary activity in the region. There were real people living here for several thousand years engaged in...

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8. On the look-out for beauty: Dorothy Wordsworth in the Trossachs

DOROTHY McMILLAN

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pp. 113-123

...William and Dorothy Wordsworth visited the Trossachs twice during their 1803 tour of Scotland. My title derives from an episode during their first visit, when they were still accompanied by Coleridge. It is an episode which...

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9. Rethinking Scott, his literary predecessors and the imagery of the Highlands

MURDO MacDONALD

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pp. 124-132

...have become a conjoined stereotype of the Highlands from which neither can escape. That is not such a problem for Landseer; indeed, without his association with Scott he would be much less known today. But it is a problem for Scott and the Highlands, because Landseer’s image...

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10. Jules Verne and the Trossachs: experience and inspiration

IAN THOMPSON

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pp. 133-140

...largely in The Trossachs. Verne’s first visit, when aged 31, was virtually accidental. At this time he was living in Paris, having completed a law degree but determined on a literary career rather than returning to his native city of Nantes to join his father’s legal practice. He married a young widow with two daughters and although notionally earning a living as a...

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11. Location, dislocation: film and the Trossachs

DAVID MANDERSON

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pp. 141-153

...The point of theme music, of course, is to become as much a part of a screen drama as the characters, the plots and the place. It announces the fictional universe the viewer is about to enter. Who can listen now to Duncan’s theme without thinking of the invented town of Tannochbrae, or of the countryside around it? It may be forty...

Bibliography

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pp. 154-166

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Contributors

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pp. 167-170

...Alastair Durie has had a long career as teacher, researcher, writer and reviewer, first at Aberdeen, then Glasgow and latterly Stirling, and for the Open University. His publications originally centred in mainstream Scottish economic history, but recently focus on the development of tourism...

Back Cover

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