Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Frontmatter

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vi-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. ix

Any book requires the dedicated assistance of many individuals and organizations. We are especially grateful for the help and assistance from several individuals within the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, including Gary Butler, Harry Harju, Jay Lawson, and Reg Rothwell. These individuals suggested a need for the book and helped push it along ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

Water in the western United States has been referred to as “liquid gold.”The over appropriation of most streams is a testament to the value of water and a source of conflict. Water flowing from a typical mountain range in the Rocky Mountains is often used for multiple purposes: for fish and wildlife habitat, for irrigation and stock watering, for municipal and...

read more

Chapter 1: Laws and Regulations Pertaining to Wetland Areas in the Intermountain West

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-22

In recent years, the federal government has grown to understand the important ecological value of wetlands. Wetlands act as natural water purification filters, flood control mechanisms, and important wildlife habitat. Federal laws designed to preserve and protect wetlands have proliferated as a result of this growing appreciation for these resources. All...

read more

Chapter 2: Variation in Hydrology, Soils, and Vegetation of Natural Palustrine Wetlands among Geologic Provinces

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 23-51

Although considered vital to wildlife, natural wetlands are not a common feature of the landscape throughout the Intermountain West (Brown et al. 1977, Williams and Dodd 1979, Ratti and Kadlec 1992). Exact estimates of wetland area are not available for this region, but in the 1780s...

read more

Chapter 3: Ecological Processes of Riverine Wetland Habitats

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-73

Riparian and wetland habitats of riverine systems are links between terrestrial and aquatic systems (Malanson 1993). They have high water tables because of their proximity to streams (Allen-Diaz 1991, Stromberg and Tiller 1996), but downhill and lateral movements of surface and subsurface water are the main forces that organize and regulate the...

read more

Chapter 4: Wildlife Use of Riverine Wetland Habitats

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 74-86

The importance of riparian habitats to wildlife is well documented, particularly in the Intermountain West (Thomas etal. 1979, Mosconi andHutto 1982, Knopf 1985, Ohmart and Anderson 1986, Bock etal. 1993). Most terrestrial vertebrates are either dependent on or make substantial seasonal use of riparian habitats (Johnson 1989). In addition, riparian...

read more

Chapter 5: Management of Riverine Wetland Habitats

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 87-104

Riverine habitats are among the most impacted ecosystems in the Inter-mountain West (Swift 1984, Kauffman 1988, Noss et al. 1995). Europeansettlers focused activities in or near riverine areas, including transpor-tation, resource extraction, agricultural production, livestock grazing,flood control and hydroelectric power development, urban development,...

read more

Chapter 6: Irrigation, Salinity, and Landscape Patterns of Natural Palustrine Wetlands

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-129

In large intermountain basins of the western United States, water for wetlands comes mostly from snowmelt in adjacent mountains (Lemlyet al. 1993, Engilis and Reid 1997, Lovvorn et al. 1999). In many cases this water reaches wetlands via irrigation systems, either through ditches, as groundwater (interflow) derived from leaky ditches or flood...

read more

Chapter 7: Wildlife of Natural Palustrine Wetlands

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 130-153

Among the many ecological functions performed by palustrine wetlands, their role in providing wildlife habitat is particularly valued by society. Numerous vertebrate species are wetland-dependent; that is, they require wetland habitats during some or all life history events. Many other species are wetland-associated; they do not require wetlands...

read more

Chapter 8: Management of Natural Palustrine Wetlands

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 154-184

Palustrine wetlands, like all aquatic ecosystems, are inextricably linked to the upland habitats that surround them. Attempts to understand these systems become even more complex when issues of scale (e.g.,spatial and temporal scales) are applied to ecosystem processes (Gelwickand Matthews 1990, Schramm and Hubert 1996). Aquatic systems act as...

read more

Chapter 9: Components, Processes, and Design of Created Palustrine Wetlands

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 185-215

Many types of created palustrine wetlands exist throughout the Intermountain West. Some examples include state and federal refuge wetlands; irrigation-created wetlands; livestock ponds; nutrient and sediment control (including wastewater treatment) wetlands; floodwater-retarding basins; ponds created from surface coal, bentonite, phosphate,...

read more

Chapter 10: Wildlife of Created Palustrine Wetlands

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 216-239

Draining and destroying natural wetlands clearly harms the wildlife, fishes, and herpetofauna that depend on them. Small impoundments can partially mitigate the losses, and properly constructed and managed palustrine ecosystems can provide habitats that are similar to those in natural wetlands (Olson 1981, Hop etal. 1989, Larson 1997) and enhance...

read more

Chapter 11: Management of Created Palustrine Wetlands

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 240-276

Since settlement, created palustrine wetlands have been coincidental and intentional products of human activities throughout the Intermountain West. Most commonly, they have been by-products of developments built for other purposes, such as livestock watering ponds, spring developments, windmill basins, produced water from oil and gas wells,...

read more

Chapter 12: Classification, Assessment, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Riverine and Palustrine Wetland Ecosystems

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 277-296

Scientists, planners, and managers of public and private lands frequently find it useful to classify, assess, monitor, and evaluate riparian and wetland ecosystems. Classification is the process of organizing information into classes, groups, or categories that are intended to be relatively discrete and internally homogeneous. Assessment is the detailed and...

read more

Conclusions and Future Directions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 297-303

The United States has an abundant supply of water, but most of the water is in the coastal regions and east of the 100th meridian. Few areas of the Intermountain West have excess water, and many areas are considered deserts. Precipitation within the Intermountain West from the Rocky Mountains to the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Mountains varies...

Appendix

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 305-312

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 313

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 315-319