Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

My first debt is to the Franke Institute at the University of Chicago, Rich and Barbara Franke, its director Jim Chandler, and the other Fellows in the 2011–12 year for their encouragement during the writing of the book. To my Chicago colleagues Fred de Armas, Martha Feldman, Anne Robertson...

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Terminology, Abbreviations, Texts

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pp. ix-xii

As explained in chapter 1, the book uses a shorthand for the liturgical placement of those Office texts that were anticipated to occur the afternoon before their “normal” days and times. Items designated for liturgical Holy Thursday (“Feria V in Coena Domini”) were thus normally sung on the afternoon of...

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Chapter 1: Symbolic Meanings, Sonic Penance

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pp. 1-28

In the ritual year of early modern Catholics, the days before Easter represented the longest single commemoration, collective and personal, of the central events of salvation. Despite the survival or re-invention of historical Holy Week traditions today, it is still hard to imagine how much prayer and...

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Chapter 2: Textual Understandings, Musical Expressions

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pp. 29-54

Different voices were present in the Tenebrae texts. The psalms and their antiphons are largely first-person accounts of tribulations not linked to specific biblical events. Jeremiah tells of the destruction of Jerusalem and the sins of the city; the Responsories are written in a variety of grammatical persons...

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Chapter 3: Devotion, Models, Circulation, 1550–1600

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pp. 55-90

Tenebrae music projected Passion commemoration and penance. Thus, a devotional context for the growing number of musical editions after 1560 can be sought in learned poetry and popular spiritual literature that treat these topoi. In a high literary register, sacred neo-Petrarchism was propagated...

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Chapter 4: Dynastic Tenebrae

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pp. 91-119

Through all the changes of the sixteenth century, Italian Triduum music reflected a wide variety of origins, institutions, and participants. Elsewhere in Europe, the surviving music is limited but evident in courts. International politics, family traditions, and personal piety shaped the Tenebrae music of...

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Chapter 5: Static Rites, Dramatic Music

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pp. 120-149

...This dynamic view of the words stands in sharp contrast to their ossifying projection, as the ritual was fixed by the gradual adoption across Europe of the Roman liturgical books and their standard selection of Lamentations verses, seconded by the seventeenth-century ceremonials describing unchanging...

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Chapter 6: European Tenebrae c. 1680

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pp. 150-185

Across the continent, the last quarter of the seventeenth century witnessed the creation of much Triduum music, ranging from Naples to Paris to Spain. Even in central Europe, new Responsories were written by Andreas Hofer (possibly for Salzburg, in CZ-KR) and J. K. Kerll (probably for Vienna or Munich...

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Chapter 7: Ad honorem Passionis: Triduum Music and Rational Piety

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pp. 186-226

Tenebrae after 1700 was sung amid new currents of devotion and social life not necessarily favorable to the allegories and emphases of its texts. Despite some recent work, eighteenth-century Catholic piety as a whole is still unclear, and the implications for the heuristic analysis of the century’s sacred...

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Chapter 8: Endings and Continuities

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pp. 227-250

Listening to Tenebrae in many parts of the Catholic world around 1760, a crisis of the ritual would not have been audible. New Lessons or Responsories were produced in any number of places, from Naples to Bergamo, among the Jeronymites of Guadalupe (Extremadura), in the central European monasteries...

Appendix: Tables 1–4

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pp. 251-258

Notes

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pp. 259-300

Bibliography

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pp. 301-324

Index

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pp. 325-337

About the Author

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p. 338