Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-2

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Introduction: The Japanese Experiment in Mexico

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pp. 3-13

On the morning of August 18, 1897, Mexican police awakened the Japanese consul general in Mexico City, Murota Toshibumi. Murota was informed that eight Japanese from the Enomoto Colony in Chiapas journeyed nearly thirty days through mountains and were in the capital waiting...

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Chapter One: Japanese Mexicans, Immigration, and the Public Imagination, 1897–1910

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pp. 14-41

The state of Chiapas invokes images of indigenous groups, the Zapatista uprising that began in January 1994, the ancient ruins of Palenque, or perhaps even the lush coffee plantations along the region of Soconusco, but one does not associate the state with the origins of the Japanese diaspora...

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Chapter Two: Japanese Orientalism and the Mexican Revolution, 1910–1920

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pp. 42-73

Described above is the alleged infiltration of Pancho Villa’s camp by three Japanese Mexicans hired by the US Military Intelligence Service to hunt down and assassinate the revolutionary leader. The three Japanese Mexicans are Tsutomu Dyo from Rancho San Geronimo, who entered...

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Chapter Three: The Japanese and Post-revolutionary Mexico, 1920s and 1930s

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pp. 74-105

By the 1920s it had been over a decade since the Japanese government created a self-imposed restriction of labor to the United States, which in turn developed a diplomatic entanglement between Mexico, Japan, and the United States. Newspaper articles and the general sentiment continued...

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Chapter Four: The Long Reach of the American Empire: Japanese Mexicans, US Hegemony, and Mexican Propaganda, 1941–1945

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pp. 106-138

In October 1942 a poster could be seen throughout Mexico depicting three individuals hanged by the neck, and with the following text, “Así es el nuevo orden nazi” [This is the New Nazi Order]. The poster, titled “Nazi New Order,” by Taller de Gráfica Popular (Popular Graphic Art...

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Chapter Five: Prisoners without Chains: The Forced Relocation of Japanese Mexicans, 1942–1945

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pp. 139-160

On December 26, 1941, the United States intercepted a message from Japanese minister Yoshiaki Miura in Mexico City to Tokyo that indicated the Japanese diplomatic corps remained free to wander the streets of Mexico undisturbed. This message provided one of the first hints of Mexico’s...

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Chapter Six: El Comité Japonésde Ayuda Mutua: Hacienda Internment Camps and Japanese Resistance, 1942–1945

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pp. 161-184

In September 2008 the Japanese Association of Mexico published one of its bimonthly bulletins that featured a cover image of the Hacienda de Temixco, located south of Mexico City in the state of Morelos near Cuernavaca (see figure 6.1).1 Today, the Hacienda de Temixco is a resort...

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Conclusion: I Am 60 Percent Mexican and 60 Percent Japanese

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pp. 185-198

The experience of the Japanese in Mexico during World War II can be understood only by examining their arrival in Mexico nearly five decades earlier. The central focus of this book has been to illustrate a very different experience for Japanese in Mexico than that experienced by Japanese...

Notes

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pp. 199-230

Bibliography

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pp. 231-240

Index

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pp. 241-249

About the Author

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p. 250