Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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List of Illustrations

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pp. xi-xii

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Introduction

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pp. xiii-xviii

Toward the end of the first century of our era, the Roman general Agricola stood on the shore of southern Scotland gazing a few miles across the Irish Sea at the rolling green hills of an island he knew to be rich in agricultural and mineral wealth. However, he did not invade Ireland, nor did the legions of Rome ever raise their banners over the fertile plains of Ulster or...

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1. The Archaeology of Roman Material in Ireland

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pp. 1-13

Philology and archaeology ideally should work together to integrate literary and material evidence in the investigation of a particular subject. The investigation of interaction between Ireland and the classical world is no exception, with literary studies aided by physical remains of Roman origin occurring in several dozen Irish sites of the early centuries A.D. The difficulty...

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2. Language:The Influence of Latin in Pre-Patrician Ireland

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pp. 14-27

Roman coins, foreign pottery sherds, and exotic burial goods all yield important archaeological evidence for contact between the Mediterranean and pre-Christian Ireland, but evidence of Latin connections to early Irish vocabulary and literacy can also illuminate relations between Rome and Ireland. This linguistic influence consists of a handful of likely commercial...

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3. Ancient Authors

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pp. 28-128

It is ironic that the earliest classical reference to Ireland may be contained in a very late document, the Ora maritima of Rufius Festus Avienus, who wrote in the mid-fourth century A.D. Avienus served as a Roman proconsul and composed rather second-rate poetry based on earlier authors. His rambling Ora maritima is a periplus, or coastal description, over...

Appendix 1: The Greek Alphabet

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pp. 129-130

Appendix 2: Classical References to Ireland

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pp. 131-134

Appendix 3: The Names of Ireland

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pp. 135-136

References

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pp. 137-140

Index

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pp. 141-148