Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Foreword

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pp. vii-xii

Disease is a fundamental aspect of the human condition. Ancient bones tell us that pathological processes are older than humankind’s written records, and sickness and death still confound us. We have not banished pain, disability, or the fear of death, even...

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Preface

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pp. xii-xviii

For most of my career I have been preoccupied with writing about the history of mental health policy and psychiatry in the United States. Given my interest in the history of medicine, in the 1970s a dean at my university suggested that perhaps I could...

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xix-xx

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Chapter One. History and Demography

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pp. 1-23

In mid-twentieth-century America, few physicians would have predicted that within decades the modern diagnostic category of osteoporosis would emerge and include millions of Americans, predominantly older women. Prior to World War II, popular attitudes...

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Chapter Two. The Origins of a Diagnosis

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pp. 24-53

The diagnostic category of osteoporosis did not appear until the mid-twentieth century, because of the weakness in and complexity of the knowledge base about bone physiology. Progress in illuminating the manner in which bones developed and changed...

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Chapter Three. The Transformation of Osteoporosis

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pp. 54-85

Concerns with the diagnostic category of osteoporosis grew, and even accelerated, as the decades passed, which was reflected in the number of published articles on this topic. Articles listed under the heading “osteoporosis (limited to English)” in PubMed in...

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Chapter Four. Popularizing a Diagnosis

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pp. 86-119

By the mid-1980s, concern with osteoporosis was no longer confined to a small clinical and research community. Interest in the diagnosis had expanded dramatically in America and included not only a broad public composed of ever larger numbers of women...

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Chapter Five. Internationalizing Osteoporosis

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pp. 120-146

“Despite the current prominence of AIDS,” wrote Robert P. Heaney in 1991, “osteoporosis may well be the disease of the 1990s.” Osteoporosis, along with Alzheimer’s disease, had the potential to become a budget buster. Even if disease prevalence among the...

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Chapter Six. Therapeutic Expansion

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pp. 147-176

Although concern with osteoporosis accelerated during and after the 1980s, the therapeutic armamentarium remained relatively limited. ERT was by far the most frequently prescribed medication, even though there were disagreements on how it should...

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Chapter Seven. Osteoporosis Triumphant?

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pp. 177-230

In July 1990, President George H. W. Bush signed a proclamation designating 1990–2000 the Decade of the Brain. The goal was “to enhance public awareness of the benefits to be derived from brain research.” The designation resulted in an extraordinary increase...

Notes

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pp. 231-274

Index

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pp. 275-284