Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

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Introduction: The Massie-Kahahawai Case as a Local Story

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pp. 1-8

In the fall of 1931 and the early months of 1932, the events of the Massie case shook the Territory of Hawai‘i to its very core. In September 1931 five local working-class youths in Hawai‘i found themselves in the midst of a shocking predicament. Joseph “Kalani” Kahahawai, Benedict “Benny” Ahakuelo, Horace Ida, David Takai, and Henry Chang stood accused of raping a white...

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Chapter 1: Local Boys: Ahakuelo, Chang, Ida, Kahahawai, and Takai as the Accused

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pp. 9-25

Despite intimidation by Detective Watson and appeals from others “in the name of the Hawaiian people,” Ben Ahakuelo held to his story that he and the other Kauluwela Boys had not assaulted Thalia Massie on the night of September 12, 1931.2 Ahakuelo was adamant that he, Joseph Kahahawai, David Takai, Horace Ida, and Henry Chang were innocent. All five young men had enjoyed...

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Chapter 2: Haole Woman: Thalia Massie and the Defense of White Womanhood

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pp. 26-43

Thalia Massie had marks on her body to indicate that she had been the victim of a very violent crime. The fact that she was a white woman and that her alleged assailants were a group of nonwhite men gave her story incredible strength. Several people have asserted that Thalia Massie was never raped. While I use the term “alleged rape” in this chapter, it is by no means...

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Chapter 3: The Killing of Joseph Kahahawai: Native Hawaiians and Stories of Resistance

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pp. 44-64

The funeral of Joseph Kahahawai was a mass gathering for Native Hawaiians and non‒Native Hawaiians alike. Friends, relatives, and those sympathetic to Kahahawai’s family as victims of injustice attended the funeral. By one estimation over two thousand people attended. David Kama publicly mourned the loss of Joe. Kama’s brother had been killed years before in an altercation...

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Chapter 4: A Closing and an Opening: The Massie-Fortescue Murder Trial

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pp. 65-76

The Territory of Hawaii v. Massie, Fortescue, Lord, and Jones was the first case of 1932 to be considered by the grand jury. The prosecutor’s office also considered it a small victory that the grand jury ultimately returned a bill of indictment in late January despite the fact that many jurors were employees of Big Five firms. A national audience followed the Massie case from the fall of...

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Chapter 5: Story, Memory, History

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pp. 77-101

Miriam Woolsey Reed’s words in 1996 about the Massie case underscore common criticisms made about oral history and public history: that people’s memories sometimes fail, or that storytellers like Glen Grant do not always get the facts straight. Inaccuracies, half-truths, and glitches in the historical record, however, are also common to written histories based on documentary...

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Epilogue: Ha'ina 'ia mai

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pp. 102-108

At the closing of many Hawaiian songs, one will often hear the familiar phrase above, signaling to the audience that the song—the story—is coming to an end. Even though they might not be fluent in ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i, or the Hawaiian language, most locals today have heard the phrase near the closing of songs often enough to understand that the story is coming to a conclusion...

Chronology of the Massie-Kahahawai Case and Its Legacy

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pp. 109-116

Notes

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pp. 117-136

Bibliography

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pp. 137-152

Index

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pp. 153-163

About the Author

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Back Cover

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