Cover

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pp. C-C

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

This book on Alabama’s Jews and the Holocaust grew from my earlier research on the subject. I had originally planned to write a book that described how Nazism, war, and the Holocaust affected African Americans’ demands for civil rights, which at the time was my primary focus. I also planned to...

Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-xvi

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Introduction

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pp. 1-18

In 1982 the Orthodox congregation Ahavas Chesed in Mobile reconsecrated a Torah scroll from the Altneuschule in Prague, Czechoslovakia, that the Nazis had seized in the midst of the Holocaust. The Nazis, over the course of their occupation of Czechoslovakia, confiscated 1,564 Torah scrolls from...

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1. Alabama’s Jews and Nazism, 1933–38

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pp. 19-39

The confluence of two events, the Scottsboro case in 1931 and the rise to power of Adolf Hitler in Germany in 1933, produced antisemitic reactions and fears as strong and vibrant as had existed under the Klan in the 1920s. For Alabama’s Central European and Eastern European Jews, these two events...

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2. The Refugee Crisis, 1938–41

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pp. 40-73

As the Nazis enforced increasingly restrictive antisemitic measures such as economic boycotts, professional and social segregation, and the legal removal of their civil rights and citizenship, German Jews were systematically isolated and marginalized. By 1938 the Nazis’ efforts to expunge the ...

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3. Zionism in Alabama, 1933–45

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pp. 74-104

The modern Zionist movement began when Theodore Herzl published Der Judenstaat in 1896 and the First Zionist Congress convened in Basel, Switzerland, in August 1897. It gained further impetus after Great Britain conquered much of the territories that comprised Palestine from the Ottoman...

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4. The Alabama Press, Nazi Antisemitism, and the Holocaust

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pp. 105-130

Alabamians, whether Jewish or non-Jewish, black or white, received most of their information about Nazism, Nazi antisemitism, and the Holocaust in roughly the same fashion: through the press, most commonly from newspapers. Newspapers in the state had no dedicated correspondents abroad;...

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5. The War

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pp. 131-166

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, brought the United States into the Second World War. Despite Japanese aggression, Hitler and Nazi Germany, not surprisingly, figured critically in how Alabama’s Jews responded to the war, whether they supported servicemen on the home front or...

Images

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pp. 167-184

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6. Antisemitism and Racism during the War

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pp. 185-205

Antisemitism had increased noticeably in Alabama during the years preceding the war, driven by the participation of northern Jews in the Scottsboro trials and the antisemitic rhetoric emanating from Nazi Germany, and such bigotry increased after the war began, especially after the American entry....

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7. Postwar Alabama

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pp. 206-224

The end of the war did not end disagreements over Zionism, as the conflict between Zionists and anti-Zionists of the ACJ continued to divide the Jewish communities in Birmingham and Montgomery and would continue to do so until the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948. In some instances...

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Postscript

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pp. 225-234

For most Alabamians and indeed most Americans, life returned to normal in the years following the end of the war. As time passed, Alabamians reflected back on World War II with growing nostalgia, remembered by many, as Studs Terkel brilliantly chronicled, as the “Good War.”1 The murder of...

Notes

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pp. 235-292

Bibliography

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pp. 293-312

Index

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pp. 313-326