Cover

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pp. C-C

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-viii

Contents

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pp. ix-x

List of Illustrations

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pp. xi-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

The research presented in this book benefited from the generous support offered by the Society for Latin American Studies, the University of London Central Research Fund, and the London School of Economics. Reflections on the field of performativity theory were assisted by a jointly awarded research grant from the British Academy....

List of Acronyms

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pp. xv-xviii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-23

When I arrived in Guatemala in October 1999, the country was in the grip of the electoral campaign for the first “free and democratic” national elections since the signing of the Guatemalan Peace Accords between the Guatemalan government and the umbrella guerrilla organization Unidad Revolucionaria ...

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1. The Problem of Context

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pp. 24-49

This chapter explores traditions of social and cultural analysis in and about Guatemala,1 and key knowledge practices related to this field. The aim is to examine a range of trajectories in social, cultural, and historical research and highlight the influential and rich reservoir of ideas for the production and figuring of the Guatemalan context historically, both nationally and ...

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2. Violence, Sovereignty, Governmentality

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pp. 50-87

This chapter explores the “contexts” of the present research further, and specifically the ways in which different cultural texts may illuminate contrasting and often contradictory aspects and interpretations of social life in Guatemala. Through juxtaposition, partiality and what is or has been “out ...

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3. Secrecy, Relation, Connection

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pp. 88-110

This chapter opens with a discussion of an ethnographic moment of partial disclosure, when I first realized that ex-combatants deployed different names for themselves and others and that names qualified different, multiple, and complex relationalities. I discuss naming practices and argue that whatever the scale, through names, pseudonyms, and nicknames partial ...

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4. Secrecy, Sociality, Merographic Analogy

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pp. 111-141

In the previous chapter I discussed naming practices among guerrilla combatants and associates and their role in the articulation of secretive and complex relationalities, grounded in selective forms of disclosure and foreclosure. I argued that secrecy challenges knowledge practices and related understandings...

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5. Sociality, Substance, Moral Order

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pp. 142-175

In this chapter I explore processes of constitution of guerrilla sociality and relationality. I argue that from accounts given by members of the Fuerzas Armadas Rebeldes (FAR) there emerge a number of perspectives on their experience of guerrilla life. Different perspectives may be said to offer different ...

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6. Secrecy, Prosthetics, Aesthetics

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pp. 176-200

This chapter is intended to be a reflection on forms of description and theorizing, that is, on the aesthetics of knowledge practices. The aim is to provide a “cultural description” of cultural categories such as “subjectivity,” “personhood,” “embodiment,” and “agency,” and not to be a “sociological analysis” (Strathern 1988, 274). I envisage the task by reflecting on the aesthetics ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 201-206

In this book I set out to explore histories of violence and cultures of secrecy in Petén, northern Guatemala, in the aftermath of the 1996 Peace Accords signed by the Guatemalan government and guerrilla insurgents. Informed by ethnographic research among displaced constituencies with experiences of militancy in the guerrilla organization Fuerzas Armadas Rebeldes...

Notes

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pp. 207-224

Bibliography

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pp. 225-242

Index

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pp. 243-249