Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

CONTENTS

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pp. v-vi

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1. THE WAR BEGINS

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pp. 1-12

...called to consider federal relations, passed by a vote of 166 to 8, an ordinance separating Texas from the United States. Declaring that the federal government was using its power as a weapon against the Southern people, the secession ordinance repealed the annexation ordinance of 1845 by which Texas joined the American Union. The measure provided that the act of...

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2. DEFENDING THE TEXAS COAST

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pp. 13-30

...South would defeat the North in a few months. When enthusiasm for military service began to wane the Confederate Congress on April 16, 1862, passed the first of several conscription laws to assure that manpower needs of the army would be met. The conscription laws were generally unpopular in Texas and elsewhere but they did serve as a continued stimulant...

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3. LIVING IN CONFEDERATE TEXAS

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pp. 31-46

...serving in Confederate or state military forces, some far away from the state. Those men, women, and children who remained at home faced new challenges as they adjusted to the impact of war. A frontier state, Texas suffered less than the other Confederate states. The major battles of the war were fought in Virginia, Tennessee, and Georgia, where physical...

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4. DEFENDING HOME AND COUNTRY

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pp. 47-58

...fought to protect their homes from Indian attacks. Just before Christmas 1863, a band of over three hundred Comanche Indians crossed the Red River and made a major raid into Montague and Cooke Counties, killing a dozen citizens, burning ten homes, and carrying off numerous horses and several women. Confederate and state troops gave pursuit but the raiders escaped back into Indian Territory before they...

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5. COLLAPSE OF THE CONFEDERACY

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pp. 59-63

...Southerners, the effort to establish a Confederate nation came to an end in early 1865. On April 9, after four years of fighting against overwhelming odds, Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House. Three days later the formal exchange of men and weapons took place. Among those in Lee's army were 617 members...

CHRONOLOGY OF EVENTS

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pp. 64-66

NOTES

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pp. 67-75

INDEX

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pp. 76-81

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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pp. 82-82

...Ralph A. Wooster is a semi-retired professor of history at Lamar University, Beaumont. An award-winning teacher and scholar, he is past president of the Texas State Historical Association and is the author and editor of numerous articles and books...