Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

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pp. ix-xii

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Acknowledgements

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pp. xiii-xvi

Th e research for this book was supported by a Seed Grant in summer 2010 and a Faculty Research Grant in summer 2011, both from Indiana University, South Bend, as well as an Overseas Research Grant from Indiana University in November 2010 and a postdoctoral stipend from the Garden and Landscape...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-6

Allotments are a very specific type of garden: usually of small size, not attached to a dwelling, they are cultivated by their tenant and family for individual consumption of the produce they yield. Flowers, herbs, berry bushes, or fruit- bearing trees may also add to their harvest. Their most common names...

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1: Definitions and Commonalities

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pp. 7-20

As indicated in the introduction, an allotment garden is a small plot of land, not attached to a dwelling, that is cultivated to produce food intended for the consumption of the gardener and his or her family. Under a variety of names, the practice of allotment or community gardening assumes slightly different...

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2: Allotments in England

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pp. 21-57

According to the English allotment historian Jeremy Burchardt, the provision of allotments prior to 1873 in England was a response to events that were disrupting the order of landed society.1 Two major factors had an impact on the origins of the allotment movement: radical agrarianism and the practice of...

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3: Kleingärten in Germany

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pp. 58-97

Within fortified medieval cities only small areas could be devoted to gardens. Larger cultivated areas were relegated to land outside the city walls. German local historians and literary sources provide evidence of such gardens in cities including Wismar, Leipzig, and Weimar.1 These gardens appear to have...

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4: Jardins ouvriers in France

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pp. 98-125

As of the Middle Ages, plots of land on the outskirts of French cities were made available to the needy or to tradesmen by guilds and convents.1 They were given different names: the “poor man’s furrows” (sillons du pauvre) in the Ardennes or Vendée or the “poor man’s field” (champ du pauvre) in Lower Brittany. During...

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5: Is There an Aesthetics of Allotments?

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pp. 126-147

As cited in the first chapter, the definition of Kleingärten (allotments) provided by the German landscape historian Gert Gröning includes “aesthetic reasons” for the cultivation of allotments.1 During the period under consideration here, allotments were cultivated by populations that were becoming...

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6: Allotments and the Design Professions

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pp. 148-156

The preceding chapter investigates manifestations of an aesthetic dimension in allotments. As a vernacular mode of intervention on the landscape, allotments were akin to the workings of long- standing but evolving agricultural traditions. They were not among the kinds of gardens that landscape designers...

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Conclusion

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pp. 157-176

These concluding remarks provide a brief outline for the development of allotments from 1919 to the present. Founded on 3 October 1926 as the Office international des fédérations des jardins ouvriers, the International Association of Workers’ Gardens met for a first congress held in Luxemburg in...

Chronology

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pp. 177-184

Organizations and Terms

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pp. 185-188

Notes

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pp. 189-210

Bibliography

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pp. 211-224

INDEX

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pp. 225-232