Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Table of Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction

WARREN VAN TINE, MICHAEL PIERCE

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pp. vii-xii

Near the end of his fourth and final term as governor of Ohio, James A. Rhodes was the guest of honor at the unveiling of a statue of him—one that the governor had convinced the General Assembly to erect—on the statehouse lawn. ...

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1. George Croghan and the Emergence of British Influence on the Ohio Frontier

ALFRED A. CAVE

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pp. 1-13

The man whose skills as an Indian trader and negotiator were instrumental in opening the Ohio country to British influence and later to white occupation was an immigrant of origins so obscure and lowly that we do not know the date of his birth. ...

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2. John Cleves Symmes and the Miami Purchase

R. DOUGLAS HURT

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pp. 14-25

John Cleves Symmes, who opened the Miami River country to settlement, became the last great proprietor in name, if not in fact, in U.S. history. In 1785, Symmes became interested in western lands as a member of Congress from New Jersey. ...

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3. Arthur St. Clair and the Establishment of U.S. Authority in the Old Northwest

JEFFREY P. BROWN

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pp. 26-40

Arthur St. Clair, the first governor of the Northwest Territory, played a significant role in the development of the early U.S. frontier and helped shape the state of Ohio’s early political system. In the process, St. Clair aroused much controversy during his long service as an army officer and frontier administrator. ...

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4. Little Turtle, Blue Jacket, and the Second Tribal Confederation, 1783-1795

ALLAN R. MILLETT

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pp. 41-59

After Congressional passage of the Land Ordinance of 1785, which provided for the survey and sale of federal lands north of the Ohio River, promised to unleash a stream of white migration into the region, outraged representatives of the area’s eleven Indian nations met along the Detroit River in late 1786 to coordinate their response. ...

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5. Thomas Worthington and the Quest for Statehood and Gentility

MARY ALICE MAIROSE

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pp. 60-71

On November 1, 1802, a confrontation between two groups illustrated a decade-long dispute over the future of the Ohio country. On one side, Thomas Worthington, Dr. Edward Tiffin (Worthington’s brother-in-law), and other Jeffersonian Republicans wanted statehood for Ohio. ...

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6. Philander Chase and College Building in Ohio

KENNETH H. WHEELER

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pp. 72-83

Through unique in temperament and philosophy, Kenyon College founder Philander Chase (1775–1852) vividly represents the goals of early Ohio college builders and leaders. To Chase and his contemporaries, Ohio was part of the western frontier. ...

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7. John Campbell and the Blending of Industrial Development and Moral Uplift in Early Ohio

PHILIP PAYNE

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pp. 84-94

During his lifetime John Campbell, described by historian Anne Kelly Knowles as the “premier example” of a southern Ohio ironmaster, played a significant role in guiding the state into the industrial age. Yet for Campbell producing pig iron and personal wealth were not enough, so he founded a town. ...

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8. John P. Parker and the Underground Railroad

MERTON L. DILLON

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pp. 95-107

Some twenty years after the Civil War ended, John P. Parker, a prosperous manufacturer and inventor of Ripley, Ohio, agreed to talk with a newspaper reporter about a part of his prewar life that, at the time, he had been at pains to hide from public view. ...

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9. Frances Dana Gage and Northern Women's Reform Activities in the Nineteenth Century

BARBARA A. TERZIAN

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pp. 108-120

Frances Dana Gage, wife, mother of eight, public speaker, poet, novelist, and newspaper columnist, wrote these words about her life’s work, the “triune cause” of antislavery, women’s rights, and temperance. When Gage was born in 1808, slavery, although illegal in Ohio, was legal across the Ohio River in Kentucky, ...

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10. Clement L. Vallandigham, the Ohio Democracy, and Loyalty during the Civil War

ROBERTA SUE ALEXANDER

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pp. 121-136

Clement L. Vallandigham, a leader of Ohio’s Democratic Party from the 1840s through the Civil War, remains as controversial a figure today as he was then. His contemporaries and historians ever since have debated his contribution to Ohio and U.S. history. They either praise or vilify him; few are neutral. ...

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11. George H. Pendleton and the Resurrection of the Democratic Party

ROBERT SAWREY

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pp. 137-150

On January 11, 1865, as the U.S. House of Representatives debated a constitutional amendment to prohibit slavery throughout the nation, George Hunt Pendleton, a four-term Democratic Congressman from Cincinnati, rose from his chair to speak against the proposal. ...

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12. B.F. Goodrich and the Industrialization of Ohio

MANSEL G. BLACKFORD

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pp. 151-163

On July 11, 1888, just three weeks before he died, Dr. Benjamin Franklin Goodrich met with the officers of the rubber company he had founded eighteen years before. Suffering from tuberculosis, Goodrich had moved to Manitou Springs, Colorado, earlier in the month, with the certainty that his health was quickly failing. ...

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13. Martin Foran and the Creation of Cleveland's Labor Movement

MICHAEL PIERCE

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pp. 164-177

In 1886, Martin Foran praised the potential of the United States. For him, the nation, guided by the hand of God, promised unbounded opportunity and the chance for men to rise and fall on their own merit. Unlike Europeans, Americans were unencumbered by restrictions of class, ...

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14. Benjamin Arnett and the Color Line in Gilded Age Ohio

MICHAEL PIERCE

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pp. 178-191

With William McKinley’s 1896 election to the presidency, Bishop Benjamin Arnett became the most powerful African American in Ohio and perhaps the nation. Arnett rose from humble origins to this position by serving two constituencies, the African American community and the Republican Party. ...

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15. Tom L. Johnson and Progressive Reform in Cleveland

ANDREW R. L. CAYTON

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pp. 192-206

In the first decade of the twentieth century, visitors passing through the foyer of the large house at 2343 Euclid Avenue in Cleveland entered a great hall dominated by a massive twelve-foot fireplace. Among the array of couches and seats surrounding the fireplace was an armchair off to the side reserved for Tom L. Johnson, ...

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16. William Oxley Thompson and Popular Education, Social Justice, and Social Control in Progressive Era Ohio

AMY FANCELLI ZALIMAS

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pp. 207-217

When William Oxley Thompson became president of Ohio State University on September 21, 1899, he could not have imagined what the next quarter century had in store for him and this relatively new state university. Upon arrival in Columbus from Miami University, where he had served as president since 1891, ...

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17. Florence E. Allen and "great changes in the status of women"

JOAN E. ORGAN

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pp. 218-227

In 1913, Cleveland native Florence Ellinwood Allen carried the banner of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) at the head of a national suffrage parade in New York City. A few months later, the Cleveland Plain Dealer noted Allen’s graduation from New York University Law School: ...

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18. Jana Edna Hunter and Black Institution Building in Ohio

VIRGINIA R. BOYNTON

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pp. 228-239

Recalling her 1905 arrival in Cleveland, Ohio, Jane Edna Hunter noted that “my search for lodgings gave me a keen insight into the conditions which confront the Negro girl who, friendless and alone, looks for a decent place to live in Cleveland.” ...

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19. Martin L. Davey: Horation Alger in the New Worlds of Tree Care and Partisan Politics

RONALD LORA

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pp. 240-253

While Martin Davey was struggling to save the Davey Tree Expert Company during the Great Depression, James Truslow Adams published his Epic of America (1931) in which the Pulitzer prize–winning historian pondered the status of the American Dream. ...

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20. George DeNucci and the Rise of Mass-Production Unionism in Ohio

WARREN VAN TINE

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pp. 254-268

During bleak depression years of the 1930s, Ohio workers took part in a national movement to gain a greater voice on the job and in society. Although the movement was centered around steel, auto, rubber and other mass-production industries, it involved all types of laborers, from retail clerks to schoolteachers and janitors. ...

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21. John W. Bricker and the Slow Death of Old Guard Republicanism

RICHARD O. DAVIES

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pp. 269-283

From the time John William Bricker first appeared on the Ohio political scene in the mid-1920s, his future seemed especially promising. He came equipped with the requisite credentials. Born and raised on a small farm in Madison County, he became a popular student leader and athlete during his undergraduate days at The Ohio State University, ...

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22. James A. Rhodes and the 1960s Origin of Contemporary Ohio

WILLIAM RUSSELL COIL

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pp. 284-298

A statue of Governor James A. Rhodes (1909–2001) stands in front of the Columbus, Ohio, government building that also bears his name. Assuming that no one else would erect a monument for him, Rhodes had the state legislature authorize the statue while he was still in office. ...

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23. Carl B. Stokes, Cleveland, and the Limits of Black Political Power

LEONARD N. MOORE

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pp. 299-310

Carl Stokes's election as mayor of Cleveland in November 1967 marked a watershed in African American history. Not only did Stokes become the first African American mayor of a major city, but his election began the transformation of the black freedom struggle from protest to politics. ...

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24. Dave Thomas, Fast Food, and Continued Opportunity in Ohio

H. G. PARSA, DAVID GERALD HOGAN

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pp. 311-324

Ohio is famed for its many great industries, ranging from airplanes to automobiles to hamburgers. Yes, hamburgers. In the Buckeye State, White Castle staked its claim in the early 1930s, when founder Billy Ingram moved his chain’s headquarters to Columbus. ...

List of Contributors

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pp. 325-330

Index

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pp. 331-338