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The Kent State University Press
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Ernest Hemingway’s early adulthood (1917–1929) was marked by his work as a journalist, wartime service, marriage, conflicts with parents, expatriation, artistic struggle, and spectacular success. In War + Ink, veteran and emerging Hemingway scholars, alongside experts in related fields, present pathbreaking research that provides important insights into this period of Hemingway’s life.

Comprised of sixteen elegantly written essays, War + Ink revisits Hemingway’s formative experiences as a cub reporter in Kansas City. It establishes a fresh set of contexts for his Italian adventure in 1918 and his novels and short stories of the 1920s, offers some provocative reflections on his fiction and the issue of truth-telling in war literature, and reexamines his later career in terms of themes, issues, or places tied to his early life. The essays vary in methodology, theoretical assumptions, and scope; what they share is an eagerness to question—and to look beyond—truisms that have long prevailed in Hemingway scholarship.

Highlights include historian Jennifer Keene’s persuasive analysis of Hemingway as a “typical doughboy,” Ellen Andrew Knodt’s unearthing of “Hemingwayesque” language spread throughout the correspondence penned by his World War I contemporaries, Susan Beegel’s account of the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic and its previously unrecognized impact on the young Hemingway, Jennifer Haytock’s adroit analysis of “destructive spectatorship” in The Sun Also Rises, Mark Cirino’s groundbreaking discussion of the instantaneous “life review” experienced by Hemingway’s dying characters (an intrusion of the speculative and the fantastic into fiction better known for its hard surfaces and harsh truths), and Matthew Nickel’s detailed interpretation of the significance of Kansas City in Across the River and Into the Trees. A trio of scholars—Celia Kingsbury, William Blazek, and Daryl Palmer—focus on “Soldier’s Home,” offering three very different readings of this quintessential narrative of an American soldier’s homecoming. Finally, Dan Clayton and Thomas G. Bowie reexamine Hemingway’s war stories in light of those told by today’s veterans.

War + Ink offers a cross section of today’s Hemingway scholarship at its best—and reintroduces us to a young Hemingway we only thought we knew.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. C-C
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page.
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acknowledgements
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Introduction
  2. Steve Paul, Gail Sinclair, and Steven Trout
  3. pp. ix-xx
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  1. Chapter 1: Hemingway in Kansas City The True Dope on Violence and Creative Sources in a Vile and Lively Place
  2. Steve Paul
  3. pp. 1-13
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  1. Chapter 2: Ernest Hemingway, 1917–1918 First Work, First War
  2. John Fenstermaker
  3. pp. 14-35
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  1. Chapter 3: Love in the Time of Influenza Hemingway and the 1918 Pandemic
  2. Susan F. Beegel
  3. pp. 36-52
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  1. Chapter 4: Hemingway A Typical Doughboy
  2. Jennifer D. Keene
  3. pp. 53-71
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  1. Chapter 5: “Pleasant, Isn’t It?” The Language of Hemingway and His World War I Contemporaries
  2. Ellen Andrews Knodt
  3. pp. 72-93
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  1. Chapter 6: Looking at Horses Destructive Spectatorship in The Sun Also Rises
  2. Jennifer Haytock
  3. pp. 94-112
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  1. Chapter 7: Idealism, Deadlock, and Decimation The Italian Experience of World War I in Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms and Emilio Lussu’s Sardinian Brigade
  2. Patrick J. Quinn and Steven Trout
  3. pp. 113-130
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  1. Chapter 8: The Fragmented Origins of Ernest Hemingway’s “A Natural History of the Dead”
  2. Matthew Forsythe
  3. pp. 131-149
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  1. Chapter 9: A Way It Never Was Propaganda and Shell Shock in “Soldier’s Home” and “A Way You’ll Never Be”
  2. Celia M. Kingsbury
  3. pp. 150-168
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  1. Chapter 10: All Quiet on the Midwestern Front “Soldier’s Home”
  2. William Blazek
  3. pp. 169-189
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  1. Chapter 11: Hemingway’s “Soldier’s Home” The Kansas Welcome Association, Abbreviations, and World War I Archives
  2. Daryl W. Palmer
  3. pp. 190-201
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  1. Chapter 12: Getting to the Truth Hemingway, Cather, and the Testimony of Two World Wars
  2. Daniel Clayton
  3. pp. 202-220
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  1. Chapter 13: The Need for Narrative in Our Time Hemingway’s “Tragic Adventure” and Regis University’s Stories from Wartime
  2. Thomas G. Bowie Jr.
  3. pp. 221-241
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  1. Chapter 14: That Supreme Moment of Complete Knowledge Hemingway’s Theory of the Vision of the Dying
  2. Mark Cirino
  3. pp. 242-260
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  1. Chapter 15: Dangerous Families A Midwestern Exorcism
  2. Lawrence Broer
  3. pp. 260-285
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  1. Chapter 16: Hemingway and Women at the Front Blowing Bridges in A Farewell to Arms, The Fifth Column, and For Whom the Bell Tolls
  2. Kim Moreland
  3. pp. 287-323
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  1. Chapter 17: Ac ross the Canal and into Kansas City Hemingway’s Westward Composition of Absolution in Across the River and into the Trees
  2. Matthew Nickel
  3. pp. 324-349
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  1. Chronology
  2. pp. 350-351
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 352-355
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 356-363
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  1. Back Cover
  2. pp. BC-BC
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