Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright Page, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

"I have had some bitter disappointments as President," reflected Harry Truman after leaving office, "but the one that has troubled me most, in a personal way, has been the failure to defeat organized opposition to a national compulsory health-insurance program."1 ...

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1. The Early Conflicts over Health Security, 1915–1941

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pp. 1-28

For Independence, Missouri, it was a typically hot and humid midsummer afternoon as the VIP-laden limousines paused at the door of the Truman Library. But for those who had come to gather in the air-conditioned comfort within, 30 July 1965 was a momentous day, ...

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2. A Presidential Health Program: From FDR to HST

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pp. 29-65

America's mobilization for defense, beginning in 1940, diverted attention from domestic reform; but the war effort that followed provided the basis for a renewed campaign for health security. Whereas Franklin Roosevelt had spurned the national health insurance question before the war, ...

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3. An Uncertain Beginning, 1946

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pp. 66-92

Harry Truman's health message-with its advocacy of national health insurance-and the 1946 congressional elections were separated by approximately one year. During the intervening twelve months the president's economic-control policies alienated so much of the electorate that Democratic office seekers declined to use Truman's name in the 1946 campaign, ...

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4. A Trying Time, 1947

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pp. 93-116

Following his surprise election victory in 1948, Harry Truman boasted that "the luckiest thing that ever happened to me was the Eightieth Congress."1 Except for proadministration commitments in foreign policy, however, GOP-directed actions on Capitol Hill seemingly portended anything but good luck for the president in 1947. ...

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5. Politics and Health: The 1948 Presidential Campaign

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pp. 117-139

In late 1947, on the eve of the second session of the Eightieth Congress, Sen. Robert A. Taft publicly challenged the Democrats to make compulsory health insurance an issue in the forthcoming national election campaign.1 ...

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6. A Testing Time, 1949

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pp. 140-173

During his last major campaign appearance of 1948, Harry Truman promised that a national health insurance program would soon be legislated, "because the Democrats are going back in power, and we are going to see that we get it."1 ...

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7. Politics, Then Health: The Medicare Compromise

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pp. 174-209

It would take the combined impact of the United States involvement in a war with North Korea and an unfavorable outcome in the November congressional elections in 1950 to move Harry Truman toward advocating the less ambitious plan of providing government hospital insurance for the aged. ...

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8. The Reality: From HST to LBJ

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pp. 210-221

Dwight Eisenhower's political and economic philosophy matched closely that of organized medicine. "I have found, in the past few years, that I have certain philosophical bonds with doctors," Ike assured an appreciative American Medical Association assembled in convention shortly after his presidential inauguration in 1953.1 ...

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9. Conclusion

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pp. 222-230

About the time medicare became law, the first scholarly historical assessments of Harry Truman's presidency were published. After an initial round of critical but generally favorable monographs, a spate of revisionist studies sharply critical of the Missourian's leadership in domestic and foreign affairs appeared. ...

Bibliography

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pp. 231-248

Index

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pp. 249-260