Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. 1-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

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pp. ix-xiv

Until quite recently it would have been difficult to name a significant landscape architect working in Canada — although as we learn from this book, for more than four decades there has been at least one woman who could claim that accolade. The name we should have known, of course, is Cornelia...

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acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvi

During the course of my research for Cornelia Hahn Oberlander: Making the Modern Landscape, many institutions and organizations gave me assistance. The Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada provided the first grant that was essential to realizing the book. I have...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

This account of Cornelia Hahn Oberlander’s life work also tells a story of modern landscape architecture. Both a biography and a history, I chronicle Oberlander’s career as it plays out ahead and alongside the profession’s unfolding from World War II to the present in North America. Most...

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Identity

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pp. 11-30

The following chronicles Cornelia Hahn Oberlander’s life from childhood to her graduation from Harvard University in 1947. It gives an account of her motives as well as the circumstances that have shaped her life, and eventually her practice as a landscape architect. Here, Oberlander’s own words order...

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Housework

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pp. 31-96

An analysis of the 1951 Landscape Architecture exhibit catalog opens this chapter. The project types and modes of representation featured in the catalog are a testament to the growing conviction that the profession must design for all segments of society — a belief realized by the fact that numerous socially...

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Human Environment

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pp. 97-148

The following describes how more spatially complex experiences afforded by the idea of environment increasingly occupied Oberlander’s and other landscape architects’ thinking in the 1960s and 1970s. While the use of the term “environ” in...

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Ecological Environment

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pp. 149-198

This chapter begins with Oberlander’s and the profession’s increasing support of the environment as a “movement,” which sought to stop the degradation of ecological systems. For landscape architects enlisted in the environmental cause this support went deeper than preventative measures against...

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Invention

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pp. 199-218

The following describes some of the design inventions that Oberlander has devised over the years. Given the scope of new projects available to landscape architects after World War II and the new design vocabulary emerging in the profession, Oberlander was often pressed to invent her own details, techniques...

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Conclusion

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pp. 219-226

I opened Cornelia Hahn Oberlander: Making the Modern Landscape with the claim that Oberlander’s narrative is also a story of modern landscape architecture. Given that her practice has spanned more than half a century, her life work has provided detailed accounts of modern landscape architecture’s...

Notes

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pp. 227-244

Bibliography

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pp. 245-261

Index

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pp. 262-272