Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Table of Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

Textual Notes

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

I have incurred many debts in researching and writing this book. Since its inception as a doctoral dissertation at York University, it has traveled with me through two continents and three universities. In the production of the dissertation, I am very grateful to my supervisory committee for their generous assistance. ...

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Chapter 1. Introduction

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pp. 1-12

On April 23, 1692, Thomas Taylor came before Justice Lawrence to report that Elizabeth Woosey had assaulted him with a pitchfork.1 Taylor decided against prosecuting Woosey by indictment because of the expense, but he wanted her to be punished in some small way, and, hopefully, dissuaded from attacking him again. ...

Part One: Prosecutors

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pp. 13-14

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Chapter 2. A Litigating Society: Victimhood and the Prosecutors of Assault

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pp. 15-31

Unlike today, many early-eighteenth-century assault victims had a great deal of agency as prosecutors.1 Victims chose whether or not they would prosecute. They could decide to prosecute an assault by indictment, which could result in a trial, or by bringing their complaint to a JP, which would usually generate a recognizance against their attacker. ...

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Chapter 3. Curbing Masculine Petty Violence: The Victims of Sexual Assault and the Mohock Scare

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pp. 32-48

Two-thirds of all Londoners who came before the Westminster Quarter Sessions brought complaints about male attackers. Though—as chapter 5 will argue—feminine violence was not insignificant and came in many forms, we cannot deny that masculine violence was far more prevalent. ...

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Chapter 4. Female Assault Victims: Pregnant Women and Battered Wives as Prosecutors

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pp. 49-62

Although the female victims of rape often met with more sympathy outside the courts than within them, as the previous chapter has shown, other female assault victims had more success in both spheres. Pregnant women and battered wives who prosecuted assault by binding over their attackers made use of cultural and medical ideas of the appropriate conduct due wives and expectant mothers. ...

Part Two: Perpetrators

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pp. 63-64

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Chapter 5. Forms of Petty Violence: The Nature and Circumstances of Masculine and Feminine Assaults

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pp. 65-90

Now that we know that victims persistently brought assailants to court, we can explore the types of petty violence that were being prosecuted in early-eighteenth-century London. This chapter examines violence as a sort of physical language, recognizing that a variety of factors, such as gender and culture, have an impact on the form an assault will take in its particular historical context. ...

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Chapter 6. Petty Violence Against the State: Assaults on the Government, Military, and Police

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pp. 91-106

The period between 1680 and 1720 was fraught with religious and political turmoil in England. Catholic King James II was forced to flee the country in 1688, and the Protestant Stadholder of the Netherlands, William of Orange, and his wife Mary were invited to take over the throne. ...

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Chapter 7. Female Assailants: Women as Rioters and Rescuers

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pp. 107-122

Just as we looked at special categories of assault victims that were particularly feminine in the first part of the book, we will now examine two categories of assault perpetrators that tended to include a significant number of women. We will explore women’s involvement in group assaults, especially riots of all kinds. ...

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Chapter 8. Conclusion

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pp. 123-128

This book began with the story of Thomas Taylor asking that Elizabeth Woosey be bound over for assaulting him with a pitchfork in 1692. In the chapters that followed, we saw that Woosey was not as unusual a woman as she might appear. Thousands of women were called before the Westminster Quarter Sessions in the decades surrounding the turn of the century ...

Appendix A: The Westminster Assault Recognizances

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pp. 129-134

Appendix B: The Bishop of London’s Consistory Court Defamation Depositions and Accounts of Felonious Violence in the OBP

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pp. 135-138

Notes

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pp. 139-188

Bibliography

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pp. 189-204

Index

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pp. 205-214

Other Titles in the Series

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