Cover

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pp. C-C

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction: Peculiar Institutions

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pp. 1-14

Until quite recently, much of the significant work treating women’s higher education in America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries centered on single-sex private liberal arts colleges in the Northeast. When the first wave of revisionist and feminist scholars in the history of...

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1. Making Modern Girls: The Ideals of the Southern Public Colleges for Women

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pp. 15-34

The features section of the 1930 Florida State College for Women yearbook is bookended by two striking photos (depicted on cover). Virginia Bailey, voted “most modern girl,” sits in the cockpit of a fixed-wing biplane, wearing a leather bomber jacket, aviator’s cap, and goggles. It’s easy to envision...

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2. Effective Literacy: Writing Instruction and Student Writing

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pp. 35-57

Until recently, scholarship on women’s rhetorical education in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries has tended to emphasize rhetorical constraints on women’s expression. Within the last decade, however, scholarly emphasis has shifted from examining how women’s voices...

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3. Evolution of Expression: Speech Arts and Public Speaking

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pp. 58-84

Historians of rhetoric have for several decades now worked to recover women’s written rhetoric in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.1 As this work has evolved beyond what Jacqueline Jones Royster and Gesa E. Kirsch have called “rescue, recovery, and (re)inscription” (31)...

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4. Useful Careers: Professional Training for Women of the New South

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pp. 85-108

"The growth of industrialism has favored women workers”: this finding came from a 1936 study sponsored by National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs in conjunction with the Alabama state chapter and Alabama College for Women (National Federation 15).1 How...

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5. The Absent Presence of Race

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pp. 109-131

The Southern Public Colleges for Women were founded in an era when, in both popular and scholarly parlance, to be “southern” meant to be white. Prior to the Civil War, southern identity coalesced around the race question as the region sought to defend—and began to define itself...

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Conclusion: A Continuing Legacy

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pp. 132-142

In her 1930 novel, of the Gastonia, North Carolina, millworkers’ labor uprising, Strike!, writer and activist Mary Heaton Vorse declared, “The South’s hard to understand. No one understands it, not even the Southerners” (8). Numerous historians have pointed out the complexity of writing...

Appendix: Name Changes of Southern Public Colleges for Women

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pp. 143-144

Notes

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pp. 145-160

Bibliography

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pp. 161-176

Index

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pp. 177-188

Author Biographies

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pp. 189-189

Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms

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pp. 190-191

Back Cover

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pp. BC-BC