Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Table of Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Ilustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

In the long maturation of this book, I have benefited greatly from the assistance and generosity of many people. In thinking about delinquency, I am convinced that it takes an engaged and supportive community to help raise a child through the troubles of adolescence. The same could be said for an intellectual project such as this one. ...

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Introduction: A Police-Centered Story of Juvenile Justice

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pp. 1-8

When most modern Americans think of police officers and juvenile delinquents in past decades, the first image that comes to mind is that of Officer Krupke, the tough street cop in the1957 Broadway musical and 1961 film, West Side Story. A big, gruff, uniformed officer, Krupke constantly pounded his nightstick in his hand, chased the young gang members at the center of the story away from their street corner hangouts, ...

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Chapter 1. Competing Ideas of Delinquency

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pp. 9-27

Police Officer Edward J. Talbot had a reputation as “the toughest man on Harrison Street,” itself a rough district in 1890s Chicago. Judge Richard S. Tuthill knew Talbot as the arresting officer for some of the worst characters brought before him. Tuthill was surprised then when Talbot also appeared in court on behalf of a little boy, arrested for vagrancy and sleeping on the streets. ...

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Chapter 2. Growing Up and Getting in Trouble in Turn-of-the-Century Detroit

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pp. 28-52

After arresting them for a string of burglaries, police characterized Cecil Hollier (age fifteen) and Charles Kert (age thirteen) as “the boldest little thugs in Detroit.” Both boys confessed to entering and robbing at least seven homes over the Christmas and New Year’s holidays in 1906, stealing an array of watches, jewelry, and opera glasses and spending their money on “good things to eat.” ...

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Chapter 3. Juvenile Justice before Juvenile Court: Detroit, 1890-1908

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pp. 53-74

Two “street urchins,” ages thirteen and eleven, stood trembling before the desk sergeant at Detroit’s central police station, holding (of all things) a mandolin and a violin. They had been brought to the station for performing outside of saloons for patrons’ spare change. ...

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Chapter 4. The Widening Net of Juvenile Justice, 1908-19

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pp. 75-100

During his tenure as commissioner of the Detroit Metropolitan Police between 1916 and 1918, James R. Couzens sought to remake his department. To the public, he was perhaps best known for demanding that his police vigorously enforce vice laws. Couzens’s real contributions lay elsewhere, though. ...

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Chapter 5. Police in the Service of Chicago's "Court of Last Resort"

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pp. 101-125

Like kids in Detroit, youths in Chicago also had occasions to fear the police, but for different reasons. In contrast to Detroit, Chicago police very rarely referred young offenders to juvenile court. In the 1920s, an Officer O’Connor, a “police probation officer” (the rough equivalent of a juvenile bureau officer elsewhere) ...

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Chapter 6. The Rise of Police Crime Prevention, 1919-40

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pp. 126-145

In 1919, August Vollmer, chief of the Berkeley (CA) Police Department, spoke before the annual meeting of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) in New Orleans and articulated a new vision of policing. The policeman, he suggested to the assembled leaders, should function “as a social worker.” ...

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Chapter 7. Shifting Priorities: Targeting Serious Crime and Minority Youth in Interwar Los Angeles

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pp. 146-167

Upon his appointment as chief of the Los Angeles Police Department for the second time in 1933, James E. Davis proclaimed three objectives. First, under his leadership, the LAPD sought to “eliminate all gangsters”; second, they would “decrease burglaries . . . [and] robberies to the lowest point in the history of the city”; ...

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Chapter 8. Saving Young Offenders or Getting Tough on Juvenile Crime?: Police and the Expanding Network of Juvenile Justice

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pp. 168-192

At about one o’clock on a Thursday afternoon in August 1940, Los Angeles Police Officers Brady and Willis saw a Latino teenager, Paul “Halloween” Silva, trying unsuccessfully to start a 1939 Buick.1 When they confronted him, Silva could not produce any proof of ownership but claimed that the car belonged to his father. ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 193-198

The 1940s represent a turning point in the histories of both juvenile justice and juvenile delinquency. On the one hand, during the 1940s, the rehabilitative ideals that had driven the juvenile court movement continued to lose support. ...

Notes

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pp. 199-236

Bibliography

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pp. 237-256

Index

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pp. 257-264

Other Titles in the Series

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