Cover

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pp. C-C

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-vi

Table of Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-xii

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

The history of Pennsylvania is usually written as that of its English-speaking inhabitants; other ethnic and linguistic groups, like Native Americans, Swedes, French Huguenots, Finns, and Germans, live their separate and somewhat isolated historiographical lives. This means that while they exist, as far as the cultural, political, economic...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

In a broadside published in September 1741, Conrad Weiser reminded his fellow German settlers of what they had hoped to achieve in immigrating to Pennsylvania: ‘‘to attain peace and security, and to more easily secure our daily bread than in Germany. All of which we have abundantly achieved [in this country].’’1 In the midst of...

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Chapter 1: The German-American Printing World

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pp. 11-48

Heady words and phrases like ‘‘print culture’’ and ‘‘public sphere’’ shape our thoughts about books.1 Authors worry whether a print culture and a public sphere existed at all in the colonial, Revolutionary, or early national period—and occasionally become depressed by indications that the Revolution may have happened without the existence...

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Chapter 2: The German-American Secular World

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pp. 49-139

We have identified printers, characterized broadsides, and defined methodological issues. What remains is the simple task of bringing together printers, broadsides, and those who craved, desired, wanted, and used broadsides. In the following chapters we will describe these interactions and analyze the motives of German settlers in acquiring...

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Chapter 3: Praying and Reading

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pp. 140-193

Elizabeth Moore’s religious visions were not simply the aberration of a black woman in extreme distress. Aside from the particular reasons, they were part of a religious culture that was shaped by the Second Great Awakening, by the religious fervor of the Methodists, and by the eschatological beliefs among radical German Pietists, whose broadsides will be discussed in this chapter. The first part of this chapter will focus on...

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Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Politics and German Political Broadsides, 1730-1830

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pp. 194-247

The discussion about Germans in the Middle Atlantic colonies and states has been largely shaped by the scholarship on acculturation of the German settlers to the dominant English political culture. The narrative is simple: after Germans began to arrive in the 1730s in ever larger numbers, English observers viewed the process with increasing...

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Conclusion

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pp. 248-254

Each day we pass a tree at the first street crossing to the left of our house, and every so often a little sheet of paper stuck to the tree catches our attention. Sometimes it tells of a lost cat, at another time it advertises a social group for new parents or a household item for sale. Occasionally there are pictures, and usually these little advertisements are...

Appendix A: Georg Hohmann’s Broadsides

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pp. 255-258

Appendix B: Statistical Tables

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pp. 259-274

Notes

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pp. 275-319

Bibliography

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pp. 320-340

Index

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pp. 341-352

Back Cover

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pp. BC-BC