Cover

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Table of Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

I would like to thank the paroled fathers who shared their lives with me. I know that many agreed to participate in this project because they wanted to help other young men like themselves. I hope that this book does justice to their time and effort. I would also like to thank the parole agents and staff at the California Youth...

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1. Prison and Fatherhood

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pp. 1-35

In recent years there has been much attention focused on economically disadvantaged young men. Two issues, crime and out-of wedlock fathering, have caused public anxiety and political debate. A perception of rampant criminal activity and irresponsible fathering has fueled welfare reform proposals, criminal law reforms, and...

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2. Fathering from Behind Bars

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pp. 36-71

All correctional facilities in the United States have strict rules governing the contact that inmates have with the outside world. These limitations are intended as a security measure and as part of an inmate’s punishment. Interestingly, the rules that govern the outside contact of juvenile inmates are even more restrictive than the...

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3. Coming Home

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pp. 72-102

Young men leave prison and return home to find that many things have changed in their absence. Girlfriends have moved on, friends have new lives, and jobs once held are no longer available. Fathers face particular challenges as they try to integrate themselves into their children’s lives. Most come home from prison with high...

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4. Negotiating Relationships

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pp. 103-128

Of the 258 surveys conducted for this project, the most challenging to schedule was with a young man named Adam. He had two jobs and five children, so I expected it to be difficult to find a time to meet with him. What surprised me, however, was that the scheduling problems we encountered had little to do with either his jobs...

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5. Young Fatherhood, Incarceration, and Public Policy

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pp. 129-152

The juvenile correctional system began in 1825 in New York with the creation of the first reform school. Before that time, juveniles who committed serious crimes were housed alongside adults in local jails. In many cases, judges pardoned children rather than send them to jail because they feared harm would come to them. These...

Notes

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pp. 153-154

Works Cited

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pp. 155-163

Index

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pp. 165-166