Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

There are of course far too many debts to acknowledge here. But the personal and intellectual support and encouragement of certain friends and colleagues have been, without exaggeration, indispensable. ...

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xv

John William Miller (1895–1978) was an American philosopher who exerted a tremendous personal influence on his many students but, because he published very little during his career, had little impact on professional philosophy during his lifetime, beyond the circles of his acquaintances.1 ...

read more

Chapter 1 Crises of Modernity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-28

Karl Marx claimed humans make history but not in circumstances of their own choosing.2 The circumstances in which we live, however, are ineluctably maintained by our efforts to make a life for ourselves. Yet they are of such a character and complexity that they cannot be maintained without being revised: ...

read more

Chapter 2 Revision of Philosophy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 29-85

Just as the movement beyond modernity requires a revision of history, so the turn toward history requires a revision of philosophy. The revision of philosophy John William Miller advocates demands a conceptualization of the midworld, a domain of both experience and the actualities to which experience attests that is not reducible to appearance or reality, ...

read more

Chapter 3 The Midworld

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 86-132

John William Miller, like Theodor Adorno, a contemporary philosopher also engaged in thinking through German idealism, affirmed the actuality of philosophy but affirmed it provisionally (Adorno 1977, 120). The actuality of philosophy today depends on its renewed actualization in altered circumstances. ...

read more

Chapter 4 Historical Displacements and Situated Narratives: Locating Responsibility

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-186

Miller was a man of his time. His being so signals not so much a limitation as an exemplary confrontation with the finite actuality of a particular phase of late modernity. Paradoxically, his relevance to our time is largely a function of his confrontation with the actuality of his time. ...

read more

Chapter 5 Critique, Narration, and Revelation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-272

The pivotal point of the previous chapter is one of John William Miller’s most basic affirmations: a price is to be paid for critique. In particular, self-critique requires the self-maintenance of those discourses, institutions, and practices on which all forms of criticism depend.1 ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 273-298

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 299-310

Name Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 311-314

Subject Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 315-323