Cover

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pp. C-C

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-viii

A Note on Transliteration

David M. Bethea

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

David M. Bethea

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pp. xi-xvi

Like anything published in recent years on a so-called “scholarly” topic, The Pushkin Handbook reflects a dynamic and at times uneasy relationship to the ambient academic culture. By that I mean that, on the one hand, any such undertaking must take into account practical issues like...

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Introduction: Of Pushkin and Pushkinists

David M. Bethea

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pp. xvii-2

Introductions to books and collections about Aleksandr Pushkin tend to begin, especially when their origin is not Russian, with de rigueur nods to the poet’s massive presence in, and seminal influence on, the native culture. Such expository scaffolding falls under the category of preemptive...

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1. Pushkin’s Biography

David M. Bethea and Sergei Davydov

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pp. 3-24

Ever since Pushkin’s first serious biographers in the mid-nineteenth century, Pavel Annenkov and Petr Bartenev,1 scholars have crossed swords over what constitutes a “fact” in the poet’s biography and what role “interpretation” is to play in arranging these so-called facts into a narrative “life.”2...

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2. Пушкинская Текстология: Академическое Издание Полного Собрания Сочинениn Пушкина

Сергеn Фомичев

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pp. 25-44

Textology has been the cornerstone of Russian Pushkin studies, especially during the Soviet period. It is concerned with providing a “creative history” of a given work by assembling all its relevant written traces, from intial conceptions in outlines, notes, and other sources, to “rough” and...

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3. Предмет наших изучениn и восторгов (рукопи Пушкина)

Татьяна Краснобородько

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pp. 45-59

The century-long gathering up of Pushkin’s archives from their various locations is a compelling story in its own right, the crucial initial turning-point being the gift by Pushkin’s son in 1880 of his father’s papers to the Rumiantsev Museum in Moscow. From that point on there commenced a spirited tug-of-war between Moscow and St. Petersburg for the right to

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4. Пушкин и проблемы поэтическоn формы: язык и стих

М. Л. Гаспаров

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pp. 60-79

The study of Pushkin’s poetic craft encompasses more, argues the author of this chapter, than the isolated description of rhymes, meters, line length, phonetic patterns, or frequency clusters.While these aspects of a Pushkin poem have been analyzed separately, they have yet to be looked at in toto,...

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5. Лирика Пушкина

О. С. Муравьева

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pp. 80-92

There are more critical-scholarly studies on Pushkin’s lyrics than on any other genre, and yet the problems presented by the poet’s use of the short form are under-studied. The reason is formal or rather, the problems arise from the difficulty of illuminating the form-and-content fusion in the...

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6. Поэмы Пушкина

Е. Ларионова

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pp. 93-125

One of the most important genres pioneered by Pushkin was the poema, or narrative poem. The present essay, conceived in the literary-historical mode traditionally associated with the Pushkin House, moves chronologically through the poet’s major narrative poems with an eye to the devices...

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7. «Евгениn Онегин»: Интерпретация‚ поэтикаR,традиция

Ю.Н. Чумаков

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pp. 126-154

Pushkin’s mid-career masterpiece is one of the central works in the Russian literary tradition. The Pushkin Handbook devotes three chapters to this novel-in-verse, beginning with the present one. Can a work so beloved and familiar as Eugene Onegin ever be read “afresh”? Free of cliché? Interpretations...

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8. Questions of Genre and Poetics in Evgenii Onegin

J. Douglas Clayton

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pp. 155-171

It is a truism that Pushkin framed the entire problematic of Evgenii Onegin (EO) in his very first mention of the work in a letter to P. A. Viazemskii: “I am now writing not a novel, but a novel in verse—a devil of a difference.” 1 Strikingly, he does not discuss the hero and heroine, nor the plot,...

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9. Evgenii Onegin as Pushkin’s Central Novel of Development

Leslie O’Bell

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pp. 172-189

In an earlier study, I tried to show how the gradual development of Evgenii Onegin1 was intertwined with the progression of Pushkin’s entire body of work, how the novel changed its conception and moved along as part and parcel of the whole. That paper involved close textological argument and...

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10. Драматургия Пушкина

М. Виролаnнен

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pp. 190-209

All of Pushkin’s dramatic writing is tied in one way or another to history, argues the author of the present essay. Furthermore, Pushkin’s dramas tend to investigate “historical self-knowledge” (samopoznanie—a coming-to-know- oneself through history). Even works by Pushkin that do not self-evidently...

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11. “Нисхождение” Пушкина к прозе

Вольф Шмид

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pp. 210-240

Pushkin’s “descent” from poetry to prose has fascinating ramifications for how we perceive him as an artist and thinker. In the present essay the author, employing the logic of structural narratology, surveys the various meanings of “prose”/ “prosaic” and “poetry”/ “poetic” as Pushkin understood...

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12. Pushkin’s Fictional and Nonfictional Prose: Tracing Trends in Scholarship

Paul Debreczeny

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pp. 241-265

The title of my piece indicates that its net has been cast wide. The scholarship to be surveyed is enormous; but the broadness of the topic gives me an opportunity to comment on the influence that the various kinds of prose writing Pushkin cultivated exercised on one another. Moreover,...

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13. Pushkin as Historical Thinker

David M. Bethea

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pp. 266-282

The topic of Pushkin and history is one of the most complicated in any study of the poet. It goes to the heart of his trajectory as complete man of letters and of his mature understanding of the relationship between the written word and “reality,” broadly defined. So pervasive has been the influence...

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14. The Evolution of Pushkin’s Political Thought

Sergei Davydov

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pp. 283-320

It is the prerogative of great minds to stir feuds among their heirs. To claim the inheritance, the descendants invoke a great ghost to testify on their behalf, only to find that their rivals have procured the same witness. Thus begins the ideological “body snatching.”...

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15. Pushkin as Critic

Caryl Emerson

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pp. 321-333

In 1828, in a letter drafted but never sent to the Moscow Herald [Moskovskii vestnik], Pushkin wrote: “I confess that in literature I am a skeptic (so as not to say worse).”1 This celebrated phrase, with its hint of nihilism, has served more to mystify than to clarify Pushkin’s position as critic. In...

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16. Pushkin and Problems of Translation

Lauren G. Leighton

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pp. 334-351

A major task remaining to Pushkinists is to reveal to English-language readers why Russians consider Pushkin their greatest poet. Clearly, the burden of this task rests on translators, who have only in our time begun to offer translations which provide a glimpse of the will-o’-the-wisp called...

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17. Из истории понимания Пушкина

С. Г. Бочаров

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pp. 352-363

The reception of Pushkin the poet and personality (lichnost’) is, again, one of the central themes running through Russian thought and culture. In this study the author focuses on one binary in the evolution of that reception: the Christian-spiritual versus the pagan image of the poet, exemplified on...

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18. Pushkin and Society: Post-1966 Perspectives

William Mills Todd III

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pp. 364-278

“Pushkin and Society” is a subject which has vexed Pushkin’s critics from the outset of his writing career. Belinsky’s famous characterization of Evgenii Onegin (“an encyclopedia of Russian life”) occupies one extreme position on the relevance of the poet’s work to an understanding of Russian...

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19. Pushkin and the Caucasus

Harsha Ram

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pp. 379-402

The critic V. G. Belinsky was hardly exaggerating when he declared that with the publication of Pushkin’s Prisoner of the Caucasus in 1822 “the grandiose image of the Caucasus with its bellicose inhabitants was recreated for the first time in Russian poetry—and only in Pushkin’s poem...

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20. The Pushkin Myth in Russia

Stephanie Sandler

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pp. 403-423

Scholarship about Pushkin as cultural myth began to appear in the 1980s, and it has already yielded a new self-consciousness within Pushkin studies. Following the example of Russia’s poets and writers who have written of Pushkin’s legacy since his lifetime and especially since his death, scholars...

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21. Pushkin and English Literature

Alexander Dolinin

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pp. 424-457

Great Britain, which was to the Russian consciousness of the first half of the nineteenth century, in the words of a contemporary, “bereg svobody, / Khudozhestv, chudakov, / Karikatur udachnykh, / Radklif, Shekspirov mrachnykh, / Rostbifa i boitsov” [shore of freedom, / arts, eccentrics, / successful caricatures, / dark Radcliffes and Shakespeares, / roast beef and...

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22. Пушкин и французская литература

Л. И. Вольп

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pp. 458-474

According to the author of the present chapter, the study of Pushkin’s relationship to French literature and culture has gone through three stages in Russia and the former Soviet Union: 1) from the mid-nineteenth century to the late 1940s; 2) from the late 1940s to the late 1950s; and 3) from the early 1960s to the present. During this time, beginning with the work of A. L....

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23. Предшественники Пушкина в ХVIII и ХIХ вв. (Держа Жуковскиn, Батюшков)

Олег Проскурин

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pp. 475-493

In the rapidly changing language stratification of 1810s–1820s Russia, one “elderly contemporary” (Derzhavin) and two “immediately slightly senior” poets (Batiushkov, Zhukovskii) played roles in Pushkin’s development distinct from other potential “fathers” and “sons.” Pushkin’s relationship to...

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24. Пушкин и литературное движение его времени

В.Э. Вацуро

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pp. 494-536

The present chapter provides three sources of information: 1) a chronological account of the shifting “literary environment” for each period of Pushkin’s life; 2) a parallel history of the major salons, journals, and their respective “camps”; and 3) a distillation of the significant scholarship on...

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25. Pushkin and Romanticism

Boris Gasparov

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pp. 537-567

Pushkin is a poet of the romantic era. His very image in Russian cultural self-consciousness as the “first” national writer, the “founder” of the literature and literary language of a new time, contains within itself the stamp of romantic messianism. In this sense, his ideal role corresponds quite well...

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26. Пушкин и реализм: Некоторые итоги и перспективы изучения проблемы

В. М. Маркович

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pp. 568-590

Just as with its twin and mirror opposite, “Romanticism,” “Realism” is a term that has shadowed debates of Pushkin’s art and career trajectory for much of the previous century. In the present chapter the author challenges the basic soundness of the formula, especially in view of the fact that by...

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27. Pushkin and Music

Boris Katz and Caryl Emerson

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pp. 591-608

For various reasons, the theme “Pushkin and Music” is a problematic domain. There is, first, a natural rivalry between the sister arts of poetry and song: great poets have reason to be wary of the cooption of their words by another temporal medium that also knows rhythm, timbre, tonality

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28. Pushkiniana as an Encyclopedia of Contemporary Literary Criticism

Svetlana Evdokimova and Vladimir Golstein

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pp. 609-638

The computer listing of the MLA Bibliography for 1991–2000 reveals that the number of entries on Pushkin (660) by far surpasses not only those on Gogol and Lermontov, but also on Dostoevsky (93), Leo Tolstoy (187), and Chekhov (378). What does this mean? Clearly, it cannot simply reflect...

Contributors

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pp. 639-646

Index

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Series Page

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pp. 666-666