Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

This book grew out a confrontation with a simple question: What is pragmatism? Perhaps I can save time for some readers by giving the answer: no one really knows. Ever since A. O. Lovejoy published “The Thirteen Pragmatisms” in 1908, any hope of permanently fixing a single meaning went out the window. Even now, the meaning of pragmatism...

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

read more

Chapter 1: Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-7

Pragmatism has undergone an extraordinary renaissance in the last two decades. Burgeoning interest in John Dewey, William James, and Charles S. Peirce has led many to embrace pragmatism as a distinctively American via media, capable of bridging the contemporary divide between philosophy as cultural criticism and philosophy as fundamental science...

read more

Chapter 2: Dewey and Realism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-29

Although Dewey’s mature metaphysical and epistemological views may be traced to a number of important influences (such as Kant, Hegel, Darwin, Peirce, and James), it would be incautious to overlook the influence evolving American realisms had upon him. Around the time of his 1905 move to Columbia...

read more

Chapter 3: Dewey and Idealism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 30-86

Dewey’s rejection of the central tenets of traditional epistemology was also a rejection of the metaphysical picture on which those tenets were based. What his pragmatism offered was not, as some have charged, just another totalizing metaphysics that places vulgar human interests at the center of everything nor “a contemplative survey of existence”...

read more

Chapter 4: Rorty, Putnam, and Classical Pragmatism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 87-154

Richard Rorty and Hilary Putnam are the most prominent representatives of neopragmatism today. Their numerous books and articles include critical studies of the classical pragmatists1 as well as new formulations of pragmatism (i.e., “neopragmatism”) for the contemporary philosophical scene...

read more

Chapter 5: Neopragmatism’s Realism/Antirealism Debate

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-176

As the twenty-first century begins, the debates between realists and antirealists show few signs of abating. At the heart of these epistemological and metaphysical debates are questions such as, What makes a sentence true? How does language hook onto the world? And “Is reality intrinsically determinate, or is its determinacy a result...

read more

Chapter 6: Beyond Realism and Antirealism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-194

The title of this chapter and book seems to promise too much: the resolution of a formidable controversy that has occupied prominent philosophers for decades. Some might say that ambitious promises don’t suit pragmatists, who should know better than to blithely reproduce the arrogance of the very philosophical defendants they would call to court...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-226

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 227-234

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-241