Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. ix

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xxvi

Maquiladoras are Mexican factories where workers assemble products for export. Established in the mid-1960s as the Border Industrialization Program, the maquiladoras—or maquilas, as they are called— have assured companies a huge return on investment, but they have also offered Mexican workers a poisoned...

I. History, Affect, Representation

read more

1. Labor Organizing in Mexico’s Entangled Economies

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-36

The history of organizing in the maquiladoras is rooted in the dawning of neoliberal capitalism and accompanies the restructuring of two economic sectors, one legal and the other extralegal, in the last half of the twentieth century. Manufacturing and the drug business are not usually thought together, nor is the return of free-market capitalism...

read more

2. The Materiality of Affect

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-68

Over the past decade or so, scholarship on affect has proliferated to the point that the trend some call the “affective turn” is already being considered passé.1 Why all of this attention to affect? One answer is history. In the past fifty years, as capitalism has profoundly invaded the human organism and harnessed...

read more

3. Bearing Witness

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 69-96

To be an organizer or an ally in an organizing campaign is to bear witness. Both the bearing and the witnessing open you to a new position in history as you assume responsibility to others and carry their message to the wider community. The “bearing” part of the phrase “bearing witness” suggests layers of meaning...

II. Sex, Labor, Movement

read more

4. Open Secrets

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-123

The open secret is a familiar figure in gay culture and sexuality studies, conjuring an epistemology in which knowing becomes not knowing.1 For the French philosopher Michel Foucault, the open secret is a silence that permeates and gives shape to the requirement to speak about some things, a discretion that accompanies...

read more

5. The Value of a Second Skin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 125-150

This chapter discusses the problem of value or, more specifically, the ways surplus value depends upon cultural value. I consider what it means to think of the cultural value adhering to social identities as a second skin that gets folded into the labor power workers exchange for a wage and is reproduced at home...

read more

6. Feeling Bodies, Jeans, Justice

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 151-176

Though “neoliberalism” may not be the name that springs to mind when most people characterize the social changes of the past four decades, those who have lived its losses know all too well what it means. This chapter considers neoliberalism’s impact on the regulation of life, including affects as biocultural...

read more

7. The North–South Encuentros

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-202

In grupos de base (small grassroots communities) across Mexico’s north and south, women are taking leadership positions, and both men and women are recasting the culture of daily life.1 Out of struggles that vary in their short-term goals but share a long-term vision of alternative possibilities, new political subjects...

III. The Utopian Question

read more

8. Love in the Common

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-226

What does love have to do with labor and community organizing in Mexico or elsewhere? The question seems preposterous, even untimely, yet we know that affective capacities are a part of the dynamic process by which political identities are formed and that they bind people to one another and, sometimes...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 227-230

This book was a long time in the making and would not have been possible without the generous support of many people and organizations. Principally, I thank the workers and organizers from grassroots groups along the northern Mexican border and in central and southern Mexico who welcomed...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 231-258

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 259-280

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 281-301