Cover

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pp. C-C

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Quotes

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pp. i-viii

Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

I am indebted to the encouragement, inspiration, and goodness of others. I am forever grateful to Fr. Gordon Jackson SSC who first instilled in me a love for philosophy and theology, spoke passionately of the writings of Saint Thomas Aquinas, and nimbly combined study with friendship. Fr. Gordon?s passion and affectivity taught me to ...

Abbreviations

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pp. xv-xvi

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One. Toward a Levinasian Lens for Christian Theology

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pp. 1-28

The theological imagination is an intriguing phenomenon, perhaps because it represents the challenge to bring together meaning about mystery, truth, and being. This intent not only creates some space for theological reflection but also centrally reveals a search and quest for Jesus the Christ. Providing an avenue by which to nurture and...

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Two. A Step into Levinas’s Philosophy

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pp. 29-72

Levinas’s thought and style are of unusual difficulty. Adriaan Peperzak, to give just one example, implies that it is impossible to arrive at a complete overall grasp of Levinas’s thought.1 But Richard Cohen argues against trying to simplify or systemize it, or even relate it too quickly to other disciplines, lest it be reduced to the ordinary level of ...

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Three. Von Balthasar’s Theological Aesthetics

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pp. 73-119

What might it mean to imagine the world otherwise? Although our world is bent on making a fortune and then consuming it at great speed on projects of vanity and machinations of pride, there exists a way beyond the material gluttonies of the self. Thinking about God and the Other creates hope for a new vision of humanity. To do this, one must take up courage and confidence to reflect on difficult...

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Four. Von Balthasar’s Theological Dramatic Theory

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pp. 120-161

There can be something quite dramatic about a theology of alterity; it can seem like a commentary on the tragic state of human beingin- the-world. To forget the face of the Other’s needs, fears, feelings, and desires portrays a self-interested ego bent on being for-itself. Naturally, people are “allergic” to one another. The Other’s face of suffering and loneliness, or even fear of death, can be readily objectified ...

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Five. Von Balthasar’s Theological Logical Theory

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pp. 162-209

There is a profound human need to understand suffering. This is not surprising, given that understanding has the potential to effect relief and well-being. But what happens when understanding is put to the test by violence or insults? Such a question points out that the state of uttering truth exists not just in the pleasant discovery...

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Six. Trinitarian Praxis

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pp. 210-254

At the very moment where everything seems lost, everything is possible. The evocative condition of alterity defines a praxis of being for the Other so that the impossible might be breached. Where praxis takes us toward a quest to encounter Jesus the Christ in the face of the Other, we have discovered something Trinitarian about our existence:...

Notes

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pp. 255-274

Bibliography

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pp. 275-286

Index

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pp. 287-293

Back Cover

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pp. BC-BC