Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xvi

For the appearance of this work, I must, above all, thank my editor at Fordham University Press, Helen Tartar. And, I am most deeply thankful. For, since first speaking with me in the autumn of 1993 about the project of which this book is an expression, she has remained steadfast—for what is now a generation of thought, at least—in her affirmation of my efforts to think the work ...

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Note on Citations

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pp. xvii-xviii

Where possible or appropriate the citations given herein to texts by W. E. B. Du Bois will be to the thirty-seven volumes of The Complete Published Writings of W. E. B. Du Bois, published by the Kraus-Thomson Org. Ltd., edited and introduced by the late Herbert Aptheker, from 1973 to 1986, as well as to the six volumes of Du Bois’s texts published...

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Anacrusis

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pp. 1-10

We must desediment the dissimulation of a war.
Yet, no speech can pretend to offer a commensuration with the massive violence of the disaster that was in Los Angeles.2
How can we speak of the massive violence that preceded what has been called the rebellion or riots in the streets of Los Angeles? How can we speak of the violence of a beating that had occurred before it had occurred? How can we find words, fashion a discourse responsible to the unnameable sense ...

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Chapter One

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pp. 11-67

In a classical philosophical opposition we are not dealing with the peaceful coexistence of a vis-à-vis, but rather with a violent hierarchy. One of the two terms governs the other (axiologically, logically, etc.), or has the upper hand. To deconstruct the opposition, first of all, is to overturn [renverser] the hierarchy at a given moment. To...

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Chapter Two

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pp. 68-111

In some considerations on what is given in The Souls of Black Folk: Essays and Sketches, John Edgar Wideman adduces the order of the problematic that we must bring into focus when we approach the matter of the autobiographical in the writing of W. E. B. Du Bois. ...

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Chapter Three

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pp. 112-128

Death always comes at least twice to one whose life is marked by greatness, once in life and again in biography. And, more radically, if death is at least double, then it most assuredly is never only double. One death always begets another death. If death, however, is understood first of all or only as loss, then the rich drama, the generosity, of this incessant ...

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Chapter Four

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pp. 129-170

It is widely believed that a real thing called “America” exists. Yet, it is precisely this idea of America in itself that we should not accept without examination. Is “America” in its truth the anchorage point that supports the social-cultural practices of African Americans? Or, is it rather a complex...

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Parenthesis

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pp. 171-178

There is no given horizon of thought or critical practice that is, or can be rendered, in its contemporary formation, commensurate with the problematic named under the heading of the problem of the Negro as a problem for thought....

Notes

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pp. 179-248

Bibliography

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pp. 249-272

Index

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pp. 273-284

Further Reading

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pp. 285-286