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Minority Education in China
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This edited volume brings together essays by leading experts exploring different aspects of ethnic minority education in China: among these are the challenges associated with bilingual and trilingual education in Xinjiang and Tibet; Han Chinese reaction to preferential minority education; the role of inland boarding schools for minority students; and the mediation of religion and culture in mul¬tiethnic schools. The book covers these topics from a range of different perspectives: Uyghur, Tibetan, Korean, Mongolian, Han, and those of the West, combining empirical field studies with theoretical approaches. Previous scholarship has explored the pedagogical and policy challenges of minority education in China; this is the first volume to recast these problems in the light of the Chinese party-state’s efforts to create ethnic harmony and stability through a shared sense of national belonging.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. C-C
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. List of Figures and Tables
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Foreword
  2. James A. Banks
  3. pp. xiii-xviii
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  1. Acknowledgements
  2. pp. xix-xx
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  1. Introduction: Minority Education in China
  2. James Leibold and Chen Yangbin
  3. pp. 1-24
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  1. Part I: Diversity in Unity or Unity in Diversity
  2. pp. 25-26
  1. 1. Education and Cultural Diversity in Multiethnic China
  2. Gerard Postiglione
  3. pp. 27-44
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  1. 2. The Power of Chinese Linguistic Imperialism and Its Challenge to Multicultural Education
  2. He Baogang
  3. pp. 45-64
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  1. 3. How Do You Say “China” in Mongolian?
  2. Naran Bilik
  3. pp. 65-80
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  1. Part II: Minority Education on the Frontier: Language and Identity
  2. pp. 81-82
  1. 4. Bilingual Education and Language Policy in Tibet
  2. Ma Rong
  3. pp. 83-106
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  1. 5. Popularizing Basic Education in Tibet’s Nomadic Regions
  2. Gerard Postiglione, Ben Jiao, Li Xiaoliang, and Tsamla
  3. pp. 107-130
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  1. 6. The Practice of Ethnic Policy in Education
  2. Zuliyati Simayi
  3. pp. 131-160
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  1. 7. Trilingual Education and School Practice in Xinjiang
  2. Linda Tsung
  3. pp. 161-186
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  1. 8. Multicultural Education and Ethnic Integration
  2. Teng Xing, Yang Hong, and Yang Qixue
  3. pp. 187-198
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  1. Part III: Educational Integration in China Proper: Pathways and Barriers
  2. pp. 199-200
  1. 9. Towards Another Minority Educational Elite Group in Xinjiang?
  2. Chen Yangbin
  3. pp. 201-220
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  1. 10. Uyghur University Students and Ramadan
  2. Timothy Grose
  3. pp. 221-238
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  1. 11. The Trilingual Trap
  2. Zhao Zhenzhou
  3. pp. 239-258
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  1. 12. Identity and Multilingualism
  2. Gao Fang
  3. pp. 259-276
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  1. Part IV: Styles, Stereotypes, and Preferences: Hurdles for Minority Education
  2. pp. 277-278
  1. 13. Intellectual Styles and Their Implications for Multicultural Education in China
  2. Li-fang Zhang
  3. pp. 279-298
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  1. 14. Han Chinese Reactions to Preferential Minority Education in the PRC
  2. James Leibold
  3. pp. 299-320
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  1. 15. How University Administrators View Ethnic Minority Students
  2. Yu Haibo
  3. pp. 321-340
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 341-352
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 353-394
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 395-406
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