Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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List of Contributors

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pp. vii-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

We thank our fellow members of the NCD Working Group for their engagement and sound advice: Sir George Alleyne (former director, Pan American Health Organization; University of the West Indies; and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University), Robert Black (Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University), Felicia Marie Knaul (Harvard Global...

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Introduction. Noncommunicable Diseases in the Developing World: Closing the Gap

Jeffrey L. Sturchio, Louis Galambos

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pp. 1-27

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)—including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma and chronic respiratory infections, and cancers—are the leading causes of death worldwide. An estimated 36 million people die from such diseases each year, or roughly two out of three deaths globally; 80% of these fatalities occur in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). The statistics are...

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1. Regulation of NCD Medicines in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Current Challenges and Future Prospects

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pp. 28-52

The growing burden of noncommunicable diseases in low- and middle- income countries has highlighted the urgent need to improve access to essential drugs and technologies.1 Considerable gaps remain, however, in the availability of essential medicines for acute and chronic conditions in LMICs, especially in Africa.
While the majority of countries have established national medicines regulatory...

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2. Improving Access to Medicines for Noncommunicable Diseases through Better Supply Chains

Lisa Smith, Prashant Yadav

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pp. 53-81

Priority noncommunicable diseases,1 such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases, and cancers, represent a large portion of the total global morbidity and mortality. Noncommunicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries account for 80% of the total global burden of NCDs.2 Current projections estimate that the total share of deaths attributable to NCDs will rise...

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3. Learning from the HIV/AIDS Experience to Improve NCD Interventions

Soeren Mattke

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pp. 82-98

For only the second time in history, the United Nations General Assembly held a high-level meeting on a health issue, in September 2011.1 This meeting addressed the growing burden of noncommunicable diseases in the developing world, which threatens to undo health gains made through better control of communicable diseases and economic growth.2 The first such meeting, in 2001, was...

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4. Reconfiguring Primary Care for the Era of Chronic and Noncommunicable Diseases

Margaret E. Kruk, Gustavo Nigenda, Felicia Marie Knaul

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pp. 99-132

Chronic and noncommunicable diseases are a rapidly growing contributor to death and disability worldwide.1 Conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and chronic respiratory disease were responsible for 36 million of the 57 million deaths in the world in 2008 and were projected to cause 44 million deaths by 2010. While these diseases have traditionally been associated with...

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5. Sectoral Cooperation for the Prevention and Control of NCDs

George Alleyne, Sania Nishtar

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pp. 133-151

This chapter will explicate the nature of and possibilities for the sectoral cooperation that is necessary for health and of particular relevance to noncommunicable diseases. It will examine the notion and possibilities of this cooperation beginning with the Political Declaration (PD) from the September 2011 United Nations High-level Meeting (HLM) on the Prevention and Control of...

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Conclusion. The Developing World and the Challenge of Noncommunicable Diseases

Stuart Gilmour, Kenji Shibuya

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pp. 152-162

The global health community is marshaling its resources and resolve to take on the challenge of noncommunicable diseases in the developing world. There is good cause to be optimistic, given the tremendous progress that has already been made throughout the world in dealing with infectious diseases. That effort has generated thousands of new institutions, new programs, and new attitudes...

Index

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pp. 163-170