Cover

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Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright

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Contents

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

Some of the most revealing chronicles of life during the Civil War came from the busiest people. Moreover, those who recorded lengthy observations tended to be well educated and farsighted. Judith Brockenbrough McGuire was in that relatively small class...

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May-December 1861

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pp. 9-56

At Home, May 4, 1861—I am too nervous, too wretched to-day to write in my diary, but that the employment will while away a few moments of this trying time. Our friends and neighbors have left us. Every thing is broken up. The Theological Seminary is closed; the High School dismissed. Scarcely any one is left of the many families which surrounded us. The homes all look desolate; and yet this beautiful country is looking more peaceful, more...

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January-August 1862

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pp. 57-112

Westwood,1 Hanover County, January 20, 1862—I pass over the sad leavetaking of our kind friends in Clarke [County] and Winchester. It was very sad, because we knew not when and under what circumstances we might meet again. We left Winchester, in the stage, for Strasburg at ten o’clock at night, on the 24th of December. The weather was bitter cold, and we congratulated...

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September 1862-May 1863

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pp. 113-162

Lynchburg, September 2—The papers to-day give glorious news of a victory to our arms on the plains of Manassas, on the 28th, 29th, and 30th. I will give General Lee’s telegram: ...

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June 1863-July 1864

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pp. 163-210

June 1 [1863]—L. and B.1 went up to Mr. Marye’s near Fredericksburg today, to visit their brother’s grave. They took flowers with which to adorn it. It is a sweet, though sad office, to plant flowers on a Christian’s grave. They saw my sister, who is there, nursing their wounded son.2...

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August 1864-May 1865

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pp. 211-264

August 11—Sheridan’s and Early’s troops are fighting in the Valley. We suffered a disaster near Martinsburg,1 and our troops fell back to Strasburg; had a fight on the old battle-ground at Kernstown, and we drove the enemy through Winchester to Martinsburg, which our troops took possession of.2 Poor Winchester, how checkered its history throughout the war!3

Acknowledgments

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pp. 265-266

Notes

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pp. 267-340

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 341-346

Index

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pp. 347-360