Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Table of Contents

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p. v

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-ix

One of the greatest pleasures of finishing this book is in acknowledging the many intellectual and personal debts I have incurred in the too many years it took to complete it. This book began as a dissertation in the English department at Cornell University...

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Introduction: The Poetics and Politics of Anglo-Indian Romance

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pp. 1-21

In late eighteenth-century India, Colonel Claude Martin (1735–1800) of the East India Company Army, who, like other Europeans in Lucknow, lived with many Indian wives or concubines, writes about his ward and later wife, Lise:...

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Part 1. Of Bibis and Begums: Company Affairs in Colonial India

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pp. 23-32

Interracial relationships in late-eighteenth century India rarely excited adverse comment, becoming visible only if there was a “scandal” attached to them or when the wills of British men became public. This was especially true of upper-class relationships because...

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1. "Half an Asiatic:" William Linnaeus Gardner and Anglo-Muslim Domesticity

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pp. 33-61

English accounts of relationships with Indian women usually imagine them as tales of rescue in which benevolent Englishmen save Indian women from distressing situations such as forced marriage, inconsiderate relatives, or worst of all, the injunction to commit...

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2. The Home and the Bazaar: The Anglo-Indian Novels of Bithia Mary Croker

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pp. 62-77

In the early twentieth century, interracial marriages and mixed homes appear frequently in writing by women romancers. They explore the permutations of nineteenth-century domestic ideology abroad, and have, until fairly recently, been an unexplored...

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Part 2. Indirect Rule and the Politics of Romance

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pp. 79-85

Anglo-Indian romances articulate a poetics of indirect rule in which themes of negotiation, conciliation, familial ties, and cultural assimilation dominate. Until 1858 the East India Company held sway in India, even though the British government had steadily curtailed...

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3. Family Quarrels: The Royal Widows and the East India Company

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pp. 86-107

British colonial writers often transformed their belief in the educative powers of government into a romance about turning natives into political allies. In this version of the romance, political opponents could be cast in familial roles, particularly when they were...

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4. Educatiing Seeta: Philip Meadows Taylor's Romances of Empire

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pp. 108-127

In my previous chapter, I discuss how the political conditions of indirect rule, leading to the vexed relationship between the British Resident and the queens of Indian states, create domestic drama. I develop this argument further by reading a record of political conflict,,,

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Conclusion: Why Romance Matters

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pp. 128-134

The ideology of romance presents love as the exceptional case which defies official rules governing social and sexual intermixing in any culture. The subversive potential of the exceptional case opens up many possibilities for arguing for the transformative...

Notes

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pp. 135-147

Bibliography

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pp. 148-157

Index

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pp. 158-161