Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

This book is a cultural history of Asian American activism and identity in the late 1960s and early 1970s. By tracing ideas about race, ethnicity, nation, and empire expressed in social movement cultures and formal cultural productions, it recuperates a set of political actions that brought into being the category of “Asian American.” ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

Throughout the research and writing of this book, I have accrued a great many debts, which I acknowledge here with deep appreciation. My immersion in Asian American studies and ethnic studies began at San Francisco State University, where I was fortunate to learn from Jeffrey Paul Chan, Ben Kobashigawa, and Roberto Rivera. ...

Abbreviations

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pp. xvii-xviii

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Introduction: From Heart Mountain to Hanoi

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pp. 1-18

By the time Pat Sumi arrived in Hanoi in the summer of 1970, she had traveled a great geographical distance and had progressed far in her journey to understand the politics of race. Yet she still had far to go. A thirdgeneration Japanese American (Sansei) born to parents newly released from the Heart Mountain concentration camp in Wyoming, ...

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1. Before Asian America

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pp. 19-39

Tensions over sameness and difference have unsettled Asian America from the late 1800s to the present. While the dominant society tends to lump Asians together regardless of ethnicity or national origin, Asians view themselves as distinct from one another. Migrants from Asia never set foot on American soil already thinking of themselves as Asians, let alone “Asian Americans.” ...

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2. “Down with Hayakawa!” Assimilation vs. Third World Solidarity at San Francisco State College

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pp. 40-72

On 21 February 1969, S. I. Hayakawa, the acting president of San Francisco State College, addressed some three hundred Japanese Americans attending a dinner at the Athletic Club in San Francisco. Inside the building, Hayakawa bathed in the warm welcome of a standing ovation by twothirds of the attendees on his entry ...

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3. Black Panthers, Red Guards, and Chinamen: Constructing Asian American Identity through Performing Blackness

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pp. 73-96

On 22 March 1969, in Portsmouth Square, a public gathering place in San Francisco’s Chinatown, a group of young Chinese Americans calling themselves the Red Guard Party held a rally to unveil their “10 Point Program.” Clad in berets and armbands, they announced a free breakfast program for children at the Commodore Stockton School, ...

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4. “Are We Not Also Asians?” Building Solidarity through Opposition to the Viet Nam War

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pp. 97-126

On 12 May 1972, the newly formed Bay Area Asian Coalition Against the War (BAACAW) announced its presence with a rally at Portsmouth Square in San Francisco. Unlike the Chinese American–dominated Red Guard Party rally held at the same location three years earlier, this gathering was multiethnic; ...

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5. Performing Radical Culture: A Grain of Sand and the Language of Liberty

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pp. 127-153

From 1970 to 1974, the Asian American folk music trio A Grain of Sand performed across the United States from New York to Los Angeles and all points between in “basements, churches, community centers, storefronts, rallies, campuses,” traveling “wherever there were events, people, or organizations that might be receptive to ‘the news.’”1 ...

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Conclusion: Fighting for the Heart of Asian America

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pp. 154-160

Chris Iijima passed away on 31 December 2005 after a prolonged battle with amyloidosis. Family and friends gathered in Los Angeles on 11 February 2006 to share their grief but also to celebrate a life and legacy of music and activism. ...

Notes

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pp. 161-182

Bibliography

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pp. 183-198

Index

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pp. 199-204

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About the Author

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Daryl J. Maeda is assistant professor of ethnic studies at the University of Colorado–Boulder, where he teaches Asian American studies and comparative ethnic studies.