In this Book

Writing History in the Digital Age
summary
Writing History in the Digital Age began as a “what-if” experiment by posing a question: How have Internet technologies influenced how historians think, teach, author, and publish? To illustrate their answer, the contributors agreed to share the stages of their book-in-progress as it was constructed on the public web. To facilitate this innovative volume, editors Jack Dougherty and Kristen Nawrotzki designed a born-digital, open-access, and open peer review process to capture commentary from appointed experts and general readers. A customized WordPress plug-in allowed audiences to add page- and paragraph-level comments to the manuscript, transforming it into a socially networked text. The initial six-week proposal phase generated over 250 comments, and the subsequent eight-week public review of full drafts drew 942 additional comments from readers across different parts of the globe. The finished product now presents 20 essays from a wide array of notable scholars, each examining (and then breaking apart and reexamining) if and how digital and emergent technologies have changed the historical profession.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. open access Download |
  1. Title Page, About the Series, Other Works in the Series, Copyright
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  1. About the Web Version
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Illustrations
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. Kristen Nawrotzki, Jack Dougherty
  3. pp. 1-18
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  1. Part 1. Re-Visioning Historical Writing
  2. pp. 19-20
  1. Is (Digital) History More than an Argument about the Past?
  2. Sherman Dorn
  3. pp. 21-34
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  1. Pasts in a Digital Age
  2. Stefan Tanaka
  3. pp. 35-46
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  1. Part 2. The Wisdom of Crowds(ourcing)
  2. pp. 47-48
  1. "I Nevertheless Am a Historian": Digital Historical Practice and Malpractice around Black Confederate Soldiers
  2. Leslie Madsen-Brooks
  3. pp. 49-63
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  1. The Historian's Craft, Popular Memory, and Wikipedia
  2. Robert S. Wolff
  3. pp. 64-74
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  1. The Wikiblitz: A Wikipedia Editing Assignment in a First-Year Undergraduate Class
  2. Shawn Graham
  3. pp. 75-85
  4. open access Download |
  1. Wikipedia and Women's History: A Classroom Experience
  2. Martha Saxton
  3. pp. 86-94
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  1. Part 3. Practice What You Teach (and teach what you practice)
  2. pp. 95-96
  1. Toward Teaching the Introductory History Course, Digitally
  2. Thomas Harbison, Luke Waltzer
  3. pp. 97-109
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  1. Learning How to Write Analog and Digital History
  2. Adrea Lawrence
  3. pp. 110-120
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  1. Teaching Wikipedia without Apologies
  2. Amanda Seligman
  3. pp. 121-130
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  1. Part 4. Writing with the Needles from Your Data Haystack
  2. pp. 131-132
  1. Historical Research and the Problem of Categories: Reflections on 10,000 Digital Note Cards
  2. Ansley T. Erickson
  3. pp. 133-145
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  1. Creating Meaning in a Sea of Information: The Women and Social Movements Web Sites
  2. Kathryn Kish Sklar, Thomas Dublin
  3. pp. 146-158
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  1. The Hermeneutics of Data and Historical Writing
  2. Fred Gibbs, Trevor Owens
  3. pp. 159-170
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  1. Part 5. See What I Mean? Visual, Spatial, and Game-Based History
  2. pp. 171-172
  1. Visualizations and Historical Arguments
  2. John Theibault
  3. pp. 173-185
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  1. Putting Harlem on the Map
  2. Stephen Robertson
  3. pp. 186-197
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  1. Pox and the City: Challenges in Writing a Digital History Game
  2. Laura Zucconi, Ethan Watrall, Hannah Ueno, Lisa Rosner
  3. pp. 198-206
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  1. Part 6. Public History on the Web: If You Build It, Will They Come?
  2. pp. 207-208
  1. Writing Chicana/o History with the Seattle Civil Rights and Labor HIstory Project
  2. Oscar Rosales Castañeda
  3. pp. 209-215
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  1. Citizen Scholars: Facebook and the Co-creation of Knowledge
  2. Amanda Grace Sikarskie
  3. pp. 216-221
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  1. The HeritageCrowd Project: A Case Study in Crowdsourcing Public History
  2. Shawn Graham, Guy Massie, Nadine Feuerherm
  3. pp. 222-232
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  1. Part 7. Collaborative Writing: Yours, Mine, and Ours
  2. pp. 233-234
  1. The Accountabliilty Partnership: Writing and Surviving in the Digital Age
  2. Natalia Mehlman Petrzela, Sarah Manekin
  3. pp. 235-245
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  1. Only Typing? Informal Writing, Blogging, and the Academy
  2. Alex Sayf Cummings, Jonathan Jarrett
  3. pp. 246-258
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  1. Conclusions: What We Learned from Writing History in the Digital Age
  2. Jack Dougherty, Kristen Nawrotzki, Charlotte D. Rochez, Timothy Burke
  3. pp. 259-278
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 279-284
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