Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. v

Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

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p. ix

The Institute of Texan Cultures opened in 1968 with exhibits depicting the cultural groups that settled early Texas. The displays resulted from a massive research effort by many young scholars into the history of Texas. This research served as the basis for writing what became known as “the ethnic pamphlet series.”...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-4

Mexican Texans have a complex identity. They encompass people who call themselves tejanos, mexicanos, indígenas, latinos, Latin Americans, Mexican Americans, Hispanics, and more. The Mexican aspect of identity is equally complex—a blending of Spanish and indigenous cultures...

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Chapter 1 Establishing Roots: The Colonial Era, 1519-1821

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pp. 5-36

IN 1519 SPANIARD Hernán Cortés docked his ship on the coast of Mexico near present-day Veracruz. He heard reports of a huge city in the interior—Tenochtitlán, seat of the Aztec empire. Cortés marched inland with a few hundred soldiers and an Indian woman to guide them. Along the way they met natives who were unhappy with Aztec rule...

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Chapter 2 Weathering a Century of Change, 1800-1900

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pp. 37-72

AT THE START OF the nineteenth century, perhaps five thousand colonial settlers lived in Texas, half of them at San Antonio de B

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Chapter 3 In the Matrix of Modern Texas, 1900-60

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pp. 73-100

THE TWENTIETH CENTURY ushered in new inventions and machines. Texas as a whole grew industrialized, with its population increasingly concentrated in cities. The Lower Rio Grande Valley was given over to commercial farming. The Mexican Revolution of 1910 to 1920 brought new waves of immigrants...

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Chapter 4 The Late Twentieth Century: Identity in a Porous Society, 1960-2000

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pp. 101-116

IN THE 1960 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION, Mexican Texans mobilized to support the Democratic ticket. Their Viva Kennedy clubs were instrumental in John F. Kennedy’s narrow win in Texas and in the nation. Kennedy disappointed supporters by failing to appoint Hispanics to federal positions...

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Conclusion

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pp. 117-122

In today’s world, Tejanos are interwoven in the fabric of American life. They hold jobs at all economic levels. In general, Tejanos of the business and professional class are weathering the economic changes brought by globalization. Blue-collar workers and farmworkers, however, face threats of displacement and increasing difficulties...

Notes

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pp. 123-130

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 131-132

Index

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pp. 133-142