Cover

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pp. C-C

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Introduction

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pp. 1-3

Modern historians and students of the Civil War have not given proper credit to the contribution that the Union governors made in winning the war and preserving the nation. The relationship of these state executives with Lincoln, while sometimes difficult, was essential to the Union’s success. Lincoln recognized that in dealing...

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The Secession Crisis

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pp. 4-14

During the course of the Civil War, fifty-nine men served as governors of the twenty-five Union states. These included the governors of the Northern free states; West Virginia, which was admitted to statehood in 1863; Nevada, admitted in 1864; and the slave states of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, which...

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The Call to Arms

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pp. 15-37

Lincoln’s agonizing decision to sustain Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, followed by the Confederate bombardment of the fort, resulted in the formal surrender of the federal garrison on April 14. The next day, Lincoln issued a proclamation calling on the states for seventy-five thousand militiamen to suppress “combinations” ...

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The War Becomes Long

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pp. 38-58

During the fall and winter of 1861–62, the mobilization of the Union armies proceeded through the governors. The goals established by Lincoln in the summer, however, were not completely achieved. Volunteers raised by the governors and the states reached 640,000 in December 1862, while the regular army barely increased ...

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The Altoona Conference

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pp. 59-78

On September 10, 1862, Radical Republican senator Zachariah Chandler of Michigan wrote to his colleague Lyman Trumbull of Illinois, “Nothing will now save us but a demand of the loyal governors, backed by a threat, that a change of policy and men shall instantly be made.”1 A few days earlier, Governor Curtin of Pennsylvania sensed the need for the governors to confer ...

Images

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pp. G1-G6

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Governor Seymour and the Copperhead Threat

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pp. 79-110

The Democratic Party, which had been splintered earlier by the Republican-led Union coalition, reemerged phoenix-like in 1862 to rally Northern dissidents and party faithful in opposition to Lincoln’s policies and in many cases to the war itself. The Democrats prepared for the fall state and local elections in a climate of bitter...

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The Union Triumphant

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pp. 111-128

On January 19, 1864, in Harrisburg, Governor Andrew Curtin gave his second inaugural address. Speaking on a platform with the original Declaration of Independence beside him, he admonished Pennsylvanians and others in the Union states to “subordinate all things . . . for the preservation of our national life.” The...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 129-130

My study of Abraham Lincoln, extending over a period of more than twenty-five years, has been aided by many people. Colleagues and students in the North Carolina State University Department of History have been a source of inspiration and support. Lincoln aficionados ...

Appendix

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pp. 131-134

Notes

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pp. 135-150

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Bibliographical Essay

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pp. 151-154

The student of the Civil War will be surprised to learn that there is no modern study of the relationship of Lincoln and the Union governors. William B. Hesseltine’s Lincoln and the War Governors (1948, 1972), though dated, has generally been accepted as the standard account of the subject. Hesseltine’s book reflected the consensus view...

Index

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pp. 155-163

About the Author, Series Page, Flaps, Back Cover

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pp. 164-167