Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Abbreviations

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pp. xi-xii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-22

When Philip Watson produced a study of Luther’s theology titled Let God Be God, many applauded this succinct rendering of Luther’s prophetic theological vision.1 In the post–World War II context of an overconfident culture driven by the desire for conquest and personal achievement, Luther’s attack on human...

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1. God's Prophet

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pp. 23-82

Born in 1483, Luther lived in a world that knew death intimately.1 And while the terrors of finitude and human limitation were hardly unique to his time, it is nevertheless difficult for us today, with our scientific grasp of reality, to understand Luther’s world. For the people of his day, one thing was clear—once...

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2. Freed to Serve

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pp. 83-116

Luther’s God-Satan dualism, which underscored his initial rendering of justification (as well as his early view of the two kingdoms), now began to undergo further development, especially following the Leipzig Disputation of 1519. Luther did not abandon the earlier model; rather, he incorporated the Augustinian dualism into a larger dynamic and dialectical framework emerging...

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3. Luther and Self-Love

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pp. 117-154

Luther’s theological development did not stop with his mature articulation of God’s twofold reign in 1522; neither did it stop with his initial “turn toward the world.” It took Luther a long time to unpack the many dimensions of his doctrine of the two realms, which he only fully expressed anthropologically as he explored the practical application of his model in the context of ongoing...

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4. Life in the Spirit

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pp. 155-190

In the summer of 1520, Luther was excommunicated in the papal bull Exsurge Domine, which listed forty-one propositions extracted from Luther’s work, all of which were condemned in globo.1 Proposition thirty-six refers to thesis 13 of the Heidelberg Disputation (1518) in which Luther argues, “Free will, after the fall, exists in name only.”2 My aim in this chapter is to understand better...

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Conclusion

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pp. 191-202

Luther’s contentious theological claims—claims that ultimately resulted in his excommunication from the Church of Rome—are first and foremost the result of a different perspective. Like the problem of drawing a round world on a flat sheet of paper, everything depends on where you start. When historian and cartographer Dr. Arno Peters first introduced his “area accurate” map in 1974...

Index

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pp. 203-208

Back Cover

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pp. 222-222