Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-3

Contents

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pp. iii-iv

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1. Introducing Matamoros: Pearl of Great Price

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pp. 1-17

“Matamoras lies in a plain exposed to all winds; those most frequently prevailing are the North and South, which may be called prevalent.”1 These words of Mexican physician Dr. Antonio Lafon, in an otherwise mundane nineteenth-century medical report concerning yellow fever in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, ...

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2. Envisioning Matamoros: Refuge among the Estuaries

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pp. 18-26

To see Matamoros as the great gateway to Mexico—the reason the city was so desirable to so many contestants in the Texas Revolution—requires an appreciation for its challenging geography, inviting appearance, and vital economics. It is hard to imagine how astonished early settlers must have been when they first encountered this rich and exotic land teeming with wildlife, ...

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3. Puerta Matamoros: Gateway to Texas, the Gulf. . . and the World

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pp. 27-37

Matamoros became a revenue-producing center for Mexico long before it attracted the plans of revolutionaries in Texas. Indeed, Matamoros was crucial in plans for reestablishing the Mexican economy, which had become burdened by tremendous debt incurred from the War of Independence with Spain. ...

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4. Patriótica Matamoros: Revolution in Texas

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pp. 38-46

Huracan was the ancient Caribbean god of wind and storm, who visited judgment upon the earth. Spaniards transliterated the indigenous word, likely of Taíno or Carib origin, into huracán to describe the terribly violent storms that seasonally plagued the Gulf, the Caribbean, and the Atlantic.2 ...

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5. Planning a Brilliant Folly: The Texan Expedition

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pp. 47-57

Despite his growing doubts, Philip Dimmitt continued to stress the advantages of occupying Matamoros. Apparently his family and business contacts in the interior, plus a visit from Julián Pedro Miracle, representing Capt. Antonio Canales Rosillo, encouraged him enough to trust that federalist cooperation could still be forthcoming under General Mexía and others.1 ...

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6. Judas, Scoundrels, Wolves, and Rascally Acquirements

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pp. 58-67

As the Matamoros expedition was getting underway, the polemical division in the Texas provisional government flared into white heat between Governor Smith, who advocated independence, and the majority of the General Council, who still favored the federalist Constitution of 1824. ...

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7. Triumphant Matamoros: The Mexican Expedition

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pp. 68-86

Before Fannin abandoned the Matamoros expedition, Antonio López de Santa Anna already had ordered his own expedition to Matamoros under the command of Gen. José de Urrea. By January 15, Urrea set out for the river city and thence to begin the campaign into Texas to secure the coast and squash the approaching attackers. ...

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8. Epilogue: Heróica Matamoros

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pp. 87-93

From the Mexican point of view, regardless of Houston’s victory at San Jacinto, the capture of Santa Anna, and the resulting Treaties of Velasco, Texas had been stolen by Anglos masquerading as colonists defending the Constitution of 1824 whose true intent was to annex Texas to the United States. ...

Notes

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pp. 94-110

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 111-112

There is a sentiment that nothing in Texas is without controversy. Certainly this is true about Matamoros and the Texas Revolution. As in any great family argument, points of view abound; it is with disquietude that one even enters into the discussion. Still, I am thankful for the opportunity. ...

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About the Author

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pp. 113-120

Craig H. Roell is a native of Victoria, Texas, the son of Henry R. and Ruth M. Roell. He earned his MA and PhD in history from the University of Texas at Austin and was Samuel Davis Postdoctoral Fellow in Business History at Ohio State University. ...

Index

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pp. 114-124