Front Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Inside Flap

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-5

Title Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 6-6

Copyright Information

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-9

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

The Political Scientist as Democrat” are the words that open David Adamany’s introduction to E. E. Schattschneider’s The Semi-Sovereign People.1 In his essay, Adamany writes of “Schattschneider’s insistence that scholarship aid Americans in self-government by addressing itself to the theory and practice of democracy.”2 ...

read more

1. Introduction: National Service as Public Policy for Democracy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-10

In the weeks following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, President George W. Bush encouraged Americans to go shopping and to visit Disneyland. At a time when the president enjoyed near-universal support for his handling of the crisis, this bully pulpit directive fell conspicuously flat. ...

read more

2. Citizenship and the Elements of Policy Design

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-34

In the United States the idea of national service has long been contested, always the exception rather than the rule.1 But there have been exceptions: members of the military service, some conscripted, have ably defended the nation. To channel martial energy into peaceful pursuits, the philosopher William James advocated waging a “moral equivalent of war.” ...

read more

Part One: The Civilian Conservation Corps

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-36

Drive through almost any American state or national park and most likely you will find a marker commemorating the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps. For nine years—from 1933 to 1942—the CCC put over three million unemployed men to work rehabilitating, protecting, and building America’s natural resources; ...

read more

3. The CCC's Roots and Relationships

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-41

In his first inaugural address, President Roosevelt declared that the “nation asks for action, and action now. Our greatest primary task is to put people to work.”1 Within a month and a day, the promise of action yielded the Emergency Conservation Work program, better known as the Civilian Conservation Corps. ...

read more

4. The CCC's Purpose and Government's Role

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 42-55

A program such as the CCC comprises multiple, overlapping elements that influence its political support and viability and communicate lessons to participants and the public, in large part through policy feedback dynamics. In short, these elements shape the politics and civics of the program, which in turn influence future policy development. ...

read more

5. The CCC's Tools, Rules, and Targets

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-78

Like its purpose and role for government, the CCC’s tools, rules, and targets—the service work it supported, its educational goals and content, the type of participants it recruited, and its obligations and inducements— influenced its political support and viability and communicated lessons to participants and the public, in large part through policy feedback dynamics. ...

read more

Part Two: Volunteers in Service to America

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 79-80

Since 1965 more than 170,000 Americans have served in the Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA), working to combat poverty in the United States. VISTA is the nation’s longest-running domestic civilian national service program; it continues today as part of AmeriCorps. ...

read more

6. VISTA's Roots and Relationships

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-87

“Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.” With these words President John F. Kennedy called America to national service. And while Kennedy’s national service legacy is tied to the Peace Corps, he also laid the groundwork for what became, under Lyndon Johnson, Volunteers in Service to America. ...

read more

7. VISTA's Purpose and Government's Role

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 88-113

A program such as VISTA comprises multiple, overlapping elements that influence its political support and viability and communicate lessons to participants and the public, in large part through policy feedback dynamics. In short, these elements shape the politics and civics of the program, which in turn influence future policy development. ...

read more

8. VISTA's Tools, Rules, and Targets

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 114-146

Like VISTA’s purpose and role for government, its tools, rules, and targets— the service work it supported, its educational goals and content, the type of participants it recruited, and its obligations and inducements— influenced its political support and viability and communicated lessons to participants and the public, in large part through policy feedback dynamics. ...

read more

Part Three: AmeriCorps

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-148

Since 1994 more than 775,000 Americans have served in AmeriCorps, working to meet the nation’s pressing educational, public safety, health, environmental, and other needs. AmeriCorps both drew on and is distinct from its predecessors: it incorporated VISTA as one of its programs, ...

read more

9. AmeriCorps's Roots and Relationships

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-159

In his first inaugural address, Bill Clinton challenged “a new generation of young people to a season of service.”1 Seven months later, he signed the legislation creating AmeriCorps to help them do just that.2 Housed in the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNS or CNCS), it has three components: ...

read more

10. AmeriCorps's Purpose and Government's Role

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 160-195

All programs, AmeriCorps included, are composed of multiple, overlapping elements that influence their political support and viability and communicate lessons to participants and the public, in large part through policy feedback dynamics. In short, these elements shape the politics and civics of the program, which in turn influence future policy development. ...

read more

11. AmeriCorps's Tools, Rules, and Targets

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 196-226

Along with its purpose and role for government, AmeriCorps’s tools, rules, and targets—the service work it supports, its educational goals and content, the type of participants it recruits, and its obligations and inducements— influence its political support and viability and communicate lessons to participants and the public, in large part through policy feedback dynamics. ...

Part Four: Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 227-228

read more

12. Making Sense of the Past and Its Lessons for the Future

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-248

In the United States, domestic civilian national service has been difficult to create and just as hard to maintain and expand. The CCC was America’s first, largest, most highly esteemed, and most explicitly civic of national service programs, but it was also the shortest-lived. VISTA was, and remains, our longest-existing program, but also our smallest and most controversial. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 249-294

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 295-304

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 322-322