Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. v

Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Muchas Gracias

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pp. ix-x

This is the story of Ed Blanchard, but it is also the story of the people and times and the country that molded him. It is a story that has come together with the help of many of Ed’s family and friends as well as the users and collectors of Blanchard bits and spurs. We give our thanks to them for both their time and their generosity ...

Part I Ed Blanchard Country

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Chapter 1 As I Know the Story

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pp. 3-14

The stout two-year-old maverick bull stirred up the dust as he charged down the steep mountainside above a wide canyon in New Mexico’s San Mateo Mountains. Hot on his heels rode a wild and reckless cowboy, rope in hand and swinging a big loop. Just as the bull headed for escape down the canyon’s rock ...

Part II As Tom Kelly Remembers

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Chapter 2 The Road to Water Canyon

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pp. 17-39

Just as Ed Blanchard was a product of the Southwest when New Mexico was still a frontier, the spurs that he made also reflected his life and times. Blanchard’s lifetime stretched from horseback days—when his livelihood was cinching his saddle on broncs and swinging his loop at wild cows ...

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Chapter 3 The Making of a Cowboy

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pp. 40-59

Edward Fred Blanchard was born in Water Canyon on September 26, 1894. Ol’ Ed was like any kid—he wasn’t an angel. He ran around over the mountainsides just like the rest of them and messed in his pants and peed in his britches. My grandmother Tinguely taught school in Water Canyon ...

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Chapter 4 From Horsebackto Horsepower

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pp. 60-88

Ed Blanchard, Jim Kelly, and Fred Martin were iducted into the army at the same time. They reported to Camp Cody at Deming, New Mexico, on April 11, 1918. The army was buying horses all over the country to be used in World War I. Some of them were six- and seven-year-olds that had never been broke, ...

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Chapter 5 Cowboy Ways

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pp. 89-100

Ed Blanchard worked at various ranches during the early 1930s, but he would go back to the Cooks every so often. One time, Ed and the Cooks were gathering cattle up in the San Mateo Mountains. They had their camp set up at a corral near San Mateo Peak. ...

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Chapter 6 The Forge and the Anvil

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pp. 101-116

Rueben Pankey was an old-time Texas cowman. He had been up the trail to Dodge City and to Hugo, Colorado, and also to the Musselshell River in Montana. He had worked on ranches throughout Texas, New Mexico, and Mexico. In 1898, he started his own ranch south of Hillsboro, New Mexico, ...

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Chapter 7 Handmade to Order

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pp. 117-131

While Ed had his twenty-section Arizona ranch, the Cook boys—Porter, Billy, and Bob—helped him with his cattle work. Ed’s ranch was close to theirs. Ed was always so busy making spurs, he didn’t have time to take care of the cows he had. ...

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Afterword Ranching in Blanchard Country, Then and Now

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pp. 132-142

The people who populated the Magdalena country of New Mexico, where Ed Blanchard and I grew up and where I still live, were in the most part ranchers, sheepmen, mining men, prospectors, and of course, the merchants, who supplied everything they all needed. The Santa Fe Railway made life easier in 1885, ...

Bibliography

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pp. 143-144

Index

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pp. 145-146