Front Cover

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pp. 1-7

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

With so much discussion of “the Other” in this book, it is not surprising that I should acknowledge so many of the people who have helped me along the way. First, I would like to thank my mentor, Victor Vitanza, for his knowledge, guidance, and friendship; without him, this book could not have been written. ...

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Prospective

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pp. 1-7

The ideas about cultural criticism, rhetoric, and psychoanalysis underpinning this book emerged from my use of cultural studies in composition courses. More specifically, they arose from problems with cultural critique in the classroom that called for further inquiry. ...

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1. On Belatedness and the Return of the Subject: Or, The View from What Will Have Been

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pp. 8-32

Perhaps it was inevitable that rhetoric and composition and cultural studies would eventually be combined. The explosion of work in the 1980s and early 1990s on poststructuralist and postmodern theory dovetailed with both the strong growth of rhetoric and composition and the development of cultural studies into a full-fledged interdisciplinary field. ...

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2. Toward a Neo-Lacanian Theory of Discourse

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pp. 33-66

The study of discourse as it has emerged in the last fifty years is strikingly diverse and interdisciplinary. It includes, according to Deborah Schiffrin’s taxonomy, speech act theory, interactional sociolinguistics, ethnographies of communication, pragmatics, conversation analysis, and variationist discourse analysis ...

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3. In the Funhouse: Mirroring Subjects and Objects

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pp. 67-96

Earlier, I proposed that subjectivity is temporal, meaning that it is constituted by the ongoing dynamics of retroactivity. Here I extend that discussion to include other forms of reflexivity pertaining to subjectivity as it emerges at the intersections of cultural studies, psychoanalysis, and rhetorical theory. ...

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4. Politica Phantasmagoria: Ideology in Cultural Studies Rhetorics

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pp. 97-137

Earlier I described a neo-Lacanian theory of discourse, arguing that it offers challenges to the communications triangle and the discursive models that work out of it, concluding with a brief explanation of the ways in which different discourse theories comprehend concepts, with “democracy” as an example. ...

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5. Breaking the Law: Resistance and the Problem of Limits

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pp. 138-159

The issue of resistance is still of great interest in English studies, and it shows up as a key topic in a good deal of work.1 Pedagogical theory reflects this concern by undertaking the time-honored goal of making students critical thinkers. What critical pedagogues want resisted are the various forms of power that complicate the achievement of a pluralist, ...

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6. “Hands Up! You’re Free: ”Pedagogy, Affect, and Transformation

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pp. 160-198

Cynicism and violence have come under increasing scrutiny by political agencies, the media, and educational organizations. According to Henry Giroux, if the professional pollsters are correct, we live in a “culture of cynicism” (“Cultural” 505). Associated with a postmodern sense of the futility of critique or of attempts to substantially change the world for the better, ...

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Retrospective

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pp. 199-214

In thinking about and working at the intersections of cultural studies, pedagogy, and psychoanalytic rhetoric, I want to make clear that such work should not be converted into a static hermeneutic framework. Freud was firm about this in The Interpretation of Dreams. Although dreams produce symbols, and symbols can become cultural commonplaces, ...

Notes

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pp. 215-228

Bibliography

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pp. 229-242

Index

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pp. 243-252

Back Cover

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pp. 266-266