Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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Illustrations

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p. ix

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiii

I became interested in both ethnic studies and military history while in graduate school at Temple University. At first, researching immigrant soldiers of the American Army during the First World War proved difficult, and this book, an exciting journey through a variety of archives, almost-...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-15

During the First World War, the U.S. government drafted into military service nearly half a million immigrants of forty-six different nationalities, creating an army with over 18 percent of its soldiers born in foreign countries....

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CHAPTER 1. In the Family of One Nation”: The Complexities of Ethnic Patriotism during the Great War

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pp. 16-44

America in 1817 was a nation in the throws of wartime mobilization. This went far beyond mustering in men for the military forces. The initial unpopular nature of the war, the threat of draft resistance, and the diversity...

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CHAPTER 2. Drafting Foreign-born Doughboys into the American Army

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pp. 45-66

The U.S. Army has traditionally consisted of both native-born and foreign-born troops. The best way to understand the influence and experience of immigrant...

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CHAPTER 3. The Camp Gordon Plan: Organizing and Training Foreign-born Troops

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pp. 67-87

When freshly recruited soldiers reported to army camps, the military was shocked to learn the extent of illiteracy among its new troops, including those with long American ancestries. The General Staff estimated that almost...

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CHAPTER 4. Military Moral Uplifting: Socializing Native-born and Foreign-born Soldiers

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pp. 88-111

The War Department needed to turn millions of civilians into productive soldiers in a rapid, efficient, and systemic manner. Yet at the same time, military leaders recognized that the same social problems that plagued civilian...

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CHAPTER 5. “Mindful ofthe Traditionsof His Race”: Respecting the Culture of the Foreign-born Draftees

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pp. 112-136

The War Department understood the vital link between maintaining a high level of troop morale and creating an effective fighting force. Although ethnic leaders willingly assisted the military, they also saw morale in terms of retaining...

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Conclusion: “Americans All!”

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pp. 137-145

During the First World War, the United States government drafted nearly a half million immigrants, and thousands of second-generation immigrants, into the American Army. The war took place on the heels of the Progressive...

Notes

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pp. 147-175

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 177-183

Index

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pp. 185-194