Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 1-6

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

About the Authors

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pp. ix-10

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xv

Over the past six years we have faced the challenging—yet extremely rewarding—project of conducting a large-scale, multilanguage political survey of Asian Americans, and then writing a book about it. Perhaps the most challenging task, however, is to come up with a set of acknowledgments...

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Chapter 1 | Making Visible: Political Participation

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pp. 1-33

In the spring of 2008, Asian American voters were showered with attention for the first time in a presidential election year, as Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama scrambled for voters after the initial set of caucuses and primaries in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, and Nevada. With...

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Chapter 2 | Settling In: Immigrant Adaptation

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pp. 34-84

Although people from Asia began to settle in the United States in significant numbers in the mid-1800s, the majority of the population today is foreign-born. In fact, of the five major racial and ethnic groups enumerated by the U.S. Census, Asian Americans are the most heavily immigrant....

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Chapter 3 | Political Geography

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pp. 85-119

Politics is an inherently spatial phenomenon. Nation-states are defined by their geographic boundaries. Electoral offices, from the Senate and the House of Representatives at the federal level to the city council, county sheriff, and district judgeships at the local level, carry jurisdictions...

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Chapter 4 | Democrat, Republican, or None of the Above?

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pp. 120-151

Today we cannot imagine electoral politics in America outside the role political parties play. Decades of research show that the political party a person identifies with remains the single most important determinant of individual vote decisions. Parties constitute key institutions through...

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Chapter 5 | National Origin, Pan-Ethnicity, and Racial Identity

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pp. 152-181

Identities are at once paradoxically personal and collective. My identity is what defines me personally and uniquely. Yet if my identity is Asian American, it is a fingerprint of individuality shared by roughly 15 million others. Consider for a moment any other trait or aspect you give as an...

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Chapter 6 | Civic Engagement: Secular and Religious Organizations

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pp. 182-209

Scholars have long debated the effects of ethnic and racial heterogeneity on democratic stability, citizenship, and civil society (Lijphart 1968; Easterly and Levine 1997; Dahl 1971). Some scholars of comparative politics argue that racial and ethnic diversity weaken civil society as the result...

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Chapter 7 | Making Sense of the Whole

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pp. 210-228

So far, we have laid out a careful descriptive account of Asian American political participation as seen through five broad sets of factors: immigrant socialization, residential contexts, party socialization, racial identification, and civic association. We have treated each of these sets of factors...

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Chapter 8 | Activists and the Future of Asian American Political Participation

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pp. 229-241

The central question motivating this book is why Asian Americans participate, or do not, in politics. In more concrete terms, how do we explain the different levels of engagement with politics expressed by the two Asian American individuals just quoted? To address this question, we...

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Appendix A | Conceptualizing Race and National Origin

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pp. 243-245

Throughout this book, we use the terms Asian and Asian American interchangeably. This use does not intend to imply an indelible groupness to our sample as defined by essential and shared biological traits or even unique geographic origins. Although it is true that Asian Americans constitute...

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Appendix B | Survey Instrument

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pp. 246-285

The 2008 NAAS was a comprehensive interview that included questions about political behavior and attitudes as well as personal experiences in immigration to the United States. Although a relatively long survey, the NAAS is similar to other social and political surveys such as the American...

Appendix C | Additional Bivariate Tables

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pp. 286-288

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Appendix D | Multivariate Models of Participation

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pp. 289-292

In specifying our models of political participation, we are confronted with several choices that entail trade-offs between telling a simpler story with basic statistical techniques and few assumptions, or a more complicated story where the pathways to participation vary by activity and perhaps...

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Appendix E | Stages of Participation

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pp. 293-301

Past studies of voter participation often distinguish multivariate results at different stages such as citizenship, registration, and voting (Wolfinger and Rosenstone 1980; DeSipio 1996; Lien 2001). We advance this analysis one step by looking at participation beyond voting to systematically assess...

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Appendix F | Survey Design

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pp. 302-314

This technical appendix provides details about survey methods, including the design of the sampling frame, the interview method and questionnaire, and the weighting technique used to relate our final interview sample to the characteristics of the Asian American population as...

Notes

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pp. 315-325

References

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pp. 327-356

Index

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pp. 357-372