In this Book

summary
Good Jobs, Bad Jobs provides an insightful analysis of how and why precarious employment is gaining ground in the labor market and the role these developments have played in the decline of the middle class. Kalleberg shows that by the 1970s, government deregulation, global competition, and the rise of the service sector gained traction, while institutional protections for workers—such as unions and minimum-wage legislation—weakened. Together, these forces marked the end of postwar security for American workers. The composition of the labor force also changed significantly; the number of dual-earner families increased, as did the share of the workforce comprised of women, non-white, and immigrant workers. Of these groups, blacks, Latinos, and immigrants remain concentrated in the most precarious and low-quality jobs, with educational attainment being the leading indicator of who will earn the highest wages and experience the most job security and highest levels of autonomy and control over their jobs and schedules. Kalleberg demonstrates, however, that building a better safety net—increasing government responsibility for worker health care and retirement, as well as strengthening unions—can go a long way toward redressing the effects of today’s volatile labor market. There is every reason to expect that the growth of precarious jobs—which already make up a significant share of the American job market—will continue. Good Jobs, Bad Jobs deftly shows that the decline in U.S. job quality is not the result of fluctuations in the business cycle, but rather the result of economic restructuring and the disappearance of institutional protections for workers. Only government, employers and labor working together on long-term strategies—including an expanded safety net, strengthened legal protections, and better training opportunities—can help reverse this trend.

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. iii-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. About the Author
  2. pp. xiii-xiii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xv-xvi
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  1. Chapter 1. Job Quality in the United States
  2. pp. 1-18
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  1. Part I. Changing Work Structures and Workers
  2. pp. 19-19
  1. Chapter 2. Economic Transformation and the Decline of Institutional Protections
  2. pp. 21-39
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  1. Chapter 3. New Workers, New Differences
  2. pp. 40-58
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  1. Part II. Inequality in Job Quality
  2. pp. 59-59
  1. Chapter 4. Dimensions of Polarity
  2. pp. 61-81
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  1. Chapter 5. Precarious Employment Relations
  2. pp. 82-104
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  1. Chapter 6. Economic Rewards: Earnings and Fringe Benefits
  2. pp. 105-131
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  1. Chapter 7. Control over Work Activities and Intrinsic Rewards
  2. pp. 132-148
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  1. Chapter 8. Time at Work: Hours, Intensity,and Control
  2. pp. 149-163
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  1. Chapter 9. Job Satisfaction
  2. pp. 164-176
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  1. Part III. Challenges for Policy
  2. pp. 177-177
  1. Chapter 10. Confronting Polarization and Precarity
  2. pp. 179-194
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  1. Chapter 11. Implementing the New Social Contract
  2. pp. 195-215
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 217-252
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  1. References
  2. pp. 253-275
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 277-292
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781610447478
Print ISBN
9780871544315
MARC Record
OCLC
861793341
Pages
312
Launched on MUSE
2015-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
N
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