Cover

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pp. 1-9

Contents

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pp. 10-11

Illustrations

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pp. xi-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

...thank first the two editors who applied their skills to this book. Countless times my wife Terre Fisher set aside her own work to slog through painfully rough chapter drafts, imposing order and readability and purging silliness. Despite the trials of living with a distracted writer, she maintained...

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Notes on Spellings and Translation

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pp. xvii-xviii

...Many Malaitan names have English origins—Dio (Joe), Falage (Frank), Biri (Billy), Tome or Tomu (Tom), Sale (Charlie). I spell these phonetically by Malaitan pronunciations (they vary by area) unless the person adopted an English spelling. For some personal and place-names I have only spellings...

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Regarding the Endnotes

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pp. xix-xx

...There are many endnotes in this book, for several reasons. First, all source citations are in the notes; their number would have made in-text placement too interruptive of the flow of text. Second, one target audience for this book is the fast-growing number of young Solomon Islander scholars who are interested in this history. Details regarding local people and events are...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-13

...This book is a political history of the island of Malaita in the British Solomon Islands Protectorate (BSIP) from 1927, when the last violent resistance to colonial rule was crushed, to 1953 and the inauguration of the first islandwide, representative political body, the Malaita Council. It is a case study...

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Chapter 1 The Half Century Before

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pp. 14-49

...This book’s main focus is a period that begins just after the colonial government crushed the last martial resistance to its rule in 1927. By then, Malaitans had been interacting with Europeans for well over 50 years, and their societies had been radically changed by their men laboring abroad and by...

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Chapter 2 Early Native Administration: Coping with Custom

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pp. 50-93

...The 1930s on Malaita are often perceived as a political lull between transformative events. As the decade began, the last violent resistance to British control had been put down, and 12 years would pass before World War II engulfed the Protectorate. The Great Depression brought economic malaise and hardship, and, for the few hundred Europeans in the group, Malaitans...

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Chapter 3 Colonial Experiments and Mounting Resentments

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pp. 94-131

...The 1930s economic crisis, particularly the collapse of copra prices, cut deeply into government resources and hamstrung any plans for development or better administration. G Lennox Barrow called copra “the very stuff of life” in the Solomons, and the 1933 Annual Report lamented that copra comprised “the sole industry of the Group upon which the Administration...

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Chapter 4 The Wartime Opening

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pp. 132-163

...As in the past, Malaitans were summoned to work on other islands, this time in the Solomon Islands Labour Corps (SILC) assisting US and allied forces on Guadalcanal and Gela, and later in the Western Solomons, under the command of district officers and plantation managers. Malaitans dominated the corps early on—in October...

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Chapter 5 The Rise of Maasina Rule

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pp. 164-213

...By late 1943, much of the southeast Solomons was rumbling with discontent and political groups were forming. Although they shared many grievances, their actions were as yet uncoordinated except as men interacted within the crucial setting of the Labour Corps, and in some places rival factions emerged. The need for a unifying leadership and platform was soon...

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Chapter 6 Maasina Rule and the Government

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pp. 214-258

...In early 1947 Maasina Rule was at its zenith. Towns were in full flower, Malaitans were settling most of their troubles by kastom, and for most people the government seemed a distant entity. This historical moment was shortlived. As the year progressed, some officers came to believe that negotiation...

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Chapter 7 Suppression and Resistance

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pp. 259-299

...Early on the morning of 31 August 1947, three forces commanded by Cameron, Marquand, and Trench staged surprise raids in north Malaita. They came on ships with squads of police from the Western Solomons. High Commissioner Nicoll had offered Fijian police, which Noel badly wanted but declined when Nicoll warned that they would draw press attention...

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Chapter 8 Attrition and Compromise

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pp. 300-326

...As 1949 drew to a close, operations to suppress Maasina Rule had been ongoing for nearly two and a half years. The results could only have disappointed officers. Some tried to boost morale by tallying successes: most fences were destroyed or rotting, a few men had agreed to labor on shorterterm contracts, and if many Malaitans now saw the government as their...

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Chapter 9 Gains and Losses

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pp. 327-346

...The general consensus in writings about Maasina Rule has been that it was largely a failure and that Malaitans in the end resubmitted to government rule. Many authors have credited Gregory-Smith’s mid-1950 release of the head chiefs—conceived as a conciliatory gesture to a movement already...

Abbreviations

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pp. 347-348

Notes

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pp. 349-446

References

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pp. 447-514

Index

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pp. 515-533