Cover

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pp. 1-3

Title Page

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pp. 4-4

Copyright Page

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pp. 5-5

Dedication Page

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pp. 6-9

Table of Contents

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pp. 10-11

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Introduction: Grape Culture, National Culture

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pp. 1-16

...argues as much. The narrator, over images of vines heavy with luscious grapes, explains that “Jefferson’s vision for the quality of American wine has been realized, but his dream of a genteel agrarian society has largely been relegated to the pages of history books. Except in one instance—the American vineyard...

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1. Tributaries of the Grape

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pp. 17-61

...Although Boston and Philadelphia had led the nation’s botanical efforts in previous decades (with the Peales and Bartrams and others in operation, as well as horticultural societies, exhibitions, and libraries functioning in those cities), by the 1840s, the locus and drive of national horticultural pursuits had...

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2. Propagating Empire

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pp. 62-93

...plant-related purchases—and one reprinted many times from 1833 to 1865. The popular book was sold at nurseries and seed shops across the East and Midwest, from Boston to New Orleans, from Cincinnati to Washington, D.C. As was becoming common, it detailed grapes and their cultural and geographic history differently and more expansively than for other fruits and...

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3. Landscapes of Fruit and Profit

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pp. 94-127

...Nicholas Longworth (1782–1863), the “father of American wine” who made his millions in real estate in Cincinnati, is an ideal example of this type of horticultural cynosure. In romanticized mid-century fashion, Longworth’s family described his methods of wealth accumulation in verse in 1857...

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4. Fear of Hybrid Grapes and Men

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pp. 128-154

...far from the only one, to articulate the connection between grapes and the construction of race in the Civil War and Reconstruction era. An October 1865 article, by a contributor with the pen name “Gladiolus,” detailed a recent excursion to the estate and vineries of a “gentleman of wealth and taste...

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5. California Wine Meets its “Destiny”

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pp. 155-193

...Fair, Cattle Show, and Industrial Exhibition, held in San Jose the previous fall. Suspicious but intrigued, the author titled the piece “The Way They Talk in California,” listing the reported behemoth size of California’s vegetables and fruits, its acres under cultivation, and its general promise as an agricultural...

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6. The Danger of a Vineyard Romance

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pp. 194-224

...sweep of human history is perhaps at its most powerful in the saga of the pioneers.” Sidestepping the “history of politics” in wine, she wrote her book of vineyards to map the “life and culture of those who crossed the continent, who settled the country and chiseled its destiny out of the earth.” But...

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Epilogue: An Empire of Wine

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pp. 225-234

...Spanning the East, Midwest, and West, Husmann’s “happy Wineland” was predicated on many things: national mission, private property and real estate speculation, inexpensive labor, and the ideology of the sober, Protestant, bourgeois family home. His treatise suggests that only...

Notes

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pp. 235-274

Bibliography

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pp. 275-282

Index

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pp. 283-296

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 297-302

...I would like to thank my families, the Hannickels, Andersons, and Vanderwolds, for creating a stimulating and loving intellectual environment throughout my life. They have supported me and modeled a dedication to critical, liberal thought and higher learning in ways I fear are now ebbing...